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    #1

    Sentence structure

    I would like to know whether the two pairs of sentences below correct or not? If not, why?

    "Everything in the world should regarded more as in motion than as at rest .

    Everything in the world should regarded as more in motion than at rest."

    "Man is limited not so much by his tools as by his vision.

    Man is limited by not so much his tools as his vision."

    Thanks for your help.

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    #2

    Re: Sentence structure

    Quote Originally Posted by Deepurple View Post
    I would like to know whether the two pairs of sentences below correct or not? If not, why?

    "Everything in the world should regarded more as in motion than as at rest .

    Everything in the world should regarded as more in motion than at rest."

    "Man is limited not so much by his tools as by his vision.

    Man is limited by not so much his tools as his vision."

    Thanks for your help.
    2. is better than 1. (delete the second "as" and it might work.)
    3. is good. 4. is inferior.


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    #3

    Re: Sentence structure

    "Everything in the world should be regarded more as 'in motion' than 'at rest'" .

    "Man is limited not so much by his tools as by his vision.
    Fine.

    Man is limited by not so much his tools as his vision."
    To try to use this construction, you would need to separate off 'not so much his tools' so that 'by' as the preposition still has direct association with its noun, 'vision', as in:

    "Man is limited by (not so much his tools) as his vision."

    Trouble is, you then have "Man is limited by as his vision" which is still wrong.
    We might try to salvage the sentence by repeating 'by':
    "Man is limited by not so much his tools as by his vision.
    Now, it's clumsy and and sounds most 'odd'. The point is:
    'not so much' modifies 'limited' so put it straight after, or before it.
    "Man is limited not so much by his tools as his vision.
    "Man is not so much limited by his tools as by his vision."
    Last edited by David L.; 29-Aug-2008 at 05:35.

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    #4

    Re: Sentence structure

    Thanks, Mr. David L,
    "Man is limited not so much by his tools as his vision.
    "Man is not so much limited by his tools as (by) his vision."

    One more question, I wondered if the preposition "by" in the second example could be left out as that in the first example above.


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    #5

    Re: Sentence structure

    "Man is limited not so much by his tools as his vision.
    "Man is not so much limited by his tools as (by) his vision."

    One more question, I wondered if the preposition "by" in the second example could be left out as that in the first example above.

    We omit words when it does not affect the meaning, and makes the sentence shorter and easier to say. This is mainly in casual conversation, as in:

    "The Beatles were as much adored by middle-aged housewives as teenage girls." ( as opposed to 'as by teenage girls').

    Your sentence is a profound observation on man in relation to his environment and his mastery of it. It is the kind of sentence I can imagine in a Presidential oration (though I have juxtaposed the sentiment):
    JFK: ""Man is not so much limited by his vision as by his tools. We have the vision: to put man on the moon. We are giving N.A.S.A. the tools: I have asked Congress to approve the doubling of N.A.S.A.'s budget."
    Churchill: "Man is not so much limited by his vision as by his tools.Give us the tools and we will finish the job."
    So - yes, you could omit it. But in this case, it would be to the detriment of the nobility of the statement.

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