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  1. Newbie
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    #1

    "capillary distribution" help for translation

    Hi,
    the exact translation from my idiom of the sentence I want to write is: "the capillary distribution of the internet connection has created new economical models."
    but I don't think that "capillary distribution" has meaning in English...
    What I mean for "capillary distribution" is a distribution all around the world also in small villages..
    any suggestion !?

    thanks you

    foo

  2. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: "capillary distribution" help for translation

    Quote Originally Posted by foo84 View Post
    Hi,
    the exact translation from my idiom of the sentence I want to write is: "the capillary distribution of the internet connection has created new economical models."
    but I don't think that "capillary distribution" has meaning in English...
    What I mean for "capillary distribution" is a distribution all around the world also in small villages..
    any suggestion !?

    thanks you

    foo
    What about "universal distribution"?

  3. Newbie
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    #3

    Re: "capillary distribution" help for translation

    Quote Originally Posted by bhaisahab View Post
    What about "universal distribution"?
    it's a little bit megalomaniac... but may be "worldwide distribution" would be good... thanks for the suggestion...

  4. BobK's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: "capillary distribution" help for translation

    What the metaphor is referring to is the way the circulation of the blood works. The smallest channels are 'capillaries'. I'm not sure this figure of speech would bear very close scrutiny, so I'd say 'world-wide' was a good word to use.

    b

  5. Raymott's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: "capillary distribution" help for translation

    Quote Originally Posted by BobK View Post
    What the metaphor is referring to is the way the circulation of the blood works. The smallest channels are 'capillaries'. I'm not sure this figure of speech would bear very close scrutiny, so I'd say 'world-wide' was a good word to use.

    b
    I think it's an excellent metaphor and would stand close scrutiny. The capillary arteries get very small down to cellular level, then the capillary veins become larger. The metaphor describes the two-way function of the fine distribution of the network.
    But I agree that the English-speaking world might not be ready for it!

    "World-wide" or "universal" are poor substitutes. A company can be called "world-wide" if it has offices in New York, London, Sydney and Tokyo. But that's the exact opposite of what a capillary network means.
    How about something like:
    "the internet connection which reaches from major cities to village level has created new economical models."

  6. BobK's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: "capillary distribution" help for translation

    Quote Originally Posted by Raymott View Post
    I think it's an excellent metaphor and would stand close scrutiny. The capillary arteries get very small down to cellular level, then the capillary veins become larger. The metaphor describes the two-way function of the fine distribution of the network.
    But I agree that the English-speaking world might not be ready for it!

    ...
    I know much less about the circulation of the blood than I do about the Internet (which I wrote about - the internal workings rather than the user-end view - as a profession for many years), almost nothing - except that if you sever an artery the whole system can die, whereas the earliest form of the Internet was designed by the US Department of Defense to survive a nuclear hit. So I can't say definitively. I suspect that if you compared the details there wouldn't be that many similarities.

    But metaphors don't have to have that accurate a reference. If it works for you it works for you. But I agree that the English-speaking world probably isn't ready for it, if only because not many people know what a capillary network is!

    b

  7. Raymott's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: "capillary distribution" help for translation

    Quote Originally Posted by BobK View Post
    - except that if you sever an artery the whole system can die,
    b
    WARNING - MEDICAL CONTENT
    True, it can. But you can have a heart attack with a complete blockage of a coronary artery and still live. This is because most arteries have "collaterals", meaning that most body tissue is supplied by overlapping blood supply. The body discovered this advantage before the internet did.
    But, yes, the metaphor would be lost because people in general don't know these things.


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    #8

    Post Re: "capillary distribution" help for translation

    Hi,

    Ive found a published reference to the term "capillary" used as a metaphor:
    • Australian historiography has often portrayed Australian education as dependent and isolated. Starting from Foucault' s notion of power as capillary, this paper traces two ways in which Australian teacher training in the first half of the twentieth century was tied into international networks. It documents some conspicuous links between key institutions and individuals. (...)
    • Australian Teacher Education 1900-1950: Conspicuous and Inconspicuous International Networks
    • Malcolm Vick
    • Paedagogica Historica, Volume 43, Issue 2 April 2007 , pages 245 - 255
  8. The article can be retrieved from the Informaworld library website.


  9. I hope it helps.

    Best regards,
    Claudio

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