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    #1

    Smile take my drawers out from under me

    I don't undertood the sentence below.

    Your associates could take my drawers out from under me and I'd be none the wiser.

    Could you help me here, please.


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    #2

    Re: take my drawers out from under me

    "Drawers" here is probably "underpants". They are so clever that [[metaphorically]] they could remove my underpants without me noticing = they are very clever and slick at doing business.

  1. BobK's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: take my drawers out from under me

    Quote Originally Posted by Anglika View Post
    "Drawers" here is probably "underpants". They are so clever that [[metaphorically]] they could remove my underpants without me noticing = they are very clever and slick at doing business.
    This would seem to make sense. Shakespeare used a similar metaphor in _A_Winter's_Tale_ - Autolycus (a pick-pocket) boasted that somewhere was so crowded that he could 'have pincht a placket' Shakespeare's Bawdy - Google Book Search . The notes in my school edition coyly said that a "placket" was "an item of intimate female attire" - I never found out exactly what!

    But why "take out"? Perhaps the 'associates' were not only smooth and sophisticated workers, but they also undermined his authority, and the "out" is left over from an unspoken metaphor about them "pulling the rug out from under him"...

    b

  2. BobK's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: take my drawers out from under me

    Another thought about your quote ".. and I'd be none the wiser" As Anglika said, it means here 'without me noticing'. You can use analogous constructions with "none"/"no less"/"none the less" and almost any comparative adjective.

    b

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