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    #1

    Question Notwithstanding

    Hi,

    Recently I have come across a sentence starting with "notwithstanding" standing alone. It might be something like that:

    This guy is extremely tall indeed. Notwithstanding, his feet are not that giant.

    The second sentence might start with "This fact notwithstanding" or anything of this kind, but it did not; it started with "notwithstanding" alone. Is this kind of construction acceptable and correct in (1) academic writing, and (b) less formal writing? (Of course, notwithstanding the formality of "notwithstanding", formality that can't be found in the example sentence above.)

    Thanks,
    Nyggus


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    #2

    Re: Notwithstanding

    It is not a common word these days, and would probably not generally be used to start a sentence.

    It sounds old-fashioned.

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    #3

    Re: Notwithstanding

    Quote Originally Posted by Anglika View Post
    It is not a common word these days, and would probably not generally be used to start a sentence.

    It sounds old-fashioned.
    but where did you see this nyggus?
    Recently I have come across a sentence starting with "notwithstanding" standing alone. It might be something like that:

    This guy is extremely tall indeed. Notwithstanding, his feet are not that giant.
    The use of "indeed"*, and the use of "giant" as a predicative adjective, suggest that the speaker may not be native; maybe he was taught 'Notwithstanding' = 'All the same' (or some 'equivalent' in his mother tongue). I'd expect - like your 'That fact notwithstanding' - "notwithstanding" to have an object; at a minimum, "Notwithstanding that..." (the pronoun "that").

    *You could say "He was very tall indeed.." or (with a different use of 'indeed') 'He was, indeed, extremely tall'. But not 'extremely tall indeed'

    b

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    #4

    Re: Notwithstanding

    Quote Originally Posted by BobK View Post
    but where did you see this nyggus?


    The use of "indeed"*, and the use of "giant" as a predicative adjective, suggest that the speaker may not be native; maybe he was taught 'Notwithstanding' = 'All the same' (or some 'equivalent' in his mother tongue). I'd expect - like your 'That fact notwithstanding' - "notwithstanding" to have an object; at a minimum, "Notwithstanding that..." (the pronoun "that").

    *You could say "He was very tall indeed.." or (with a different use of 'indeed') 'He was, indeed, extremely tall'. But not 'extremely tall indeed'

    b
    Thanks, Bob. At first I did not fully follow your comments on "indeed". But then I checked Swan's "Practical English Usage", and indeed* with "extremely" it should not be used.

    * I hope this use of "indeed" is correct. Isn't it?

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    #5

    Re: Notwithstanding



    b

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    #6

    Re: Notwithstanding

    A thought being a by-product of this thread:

    If a non-native English speaker really wants to write correctly in English, he/she should check every single word's, every single phrase's meaning AND usage, he/she should check everything in his/her sentence, no matter how much he/she is sure of what the sentence says and how it is written. (One should also revise one's sentences for length ). Too true, too sad.

    Nyggus

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    #7

    Re: Notwithstanding

    Quote Originally Posted by nyggus View Post
    A thought being a by-product of this thread:

    If a non-native English speaker really wants to write correctly in English, he/she should check every single word's, every single phrase's meaning AND usage, he/she should check everything in his/her sentence, no matter how much he/she is sure of what the sentence says and how it is written. (One should also revise one's sentences for length ). Too true, too sad.

    Nyggus
    Not just non-native English speakers!

    b

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