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    #1

    Giving directions

    Hey,

    can we equally use the following without a difference in meaning?

    #1 Turn left / on the left / to the left

    #2 Take the next left / on the left / to the left


    And one more question:

    Can we call 'crossroads' any place where two roads meet? Or do we have to use the name only for the instance when two roads really cross each other resembling letter X? If so, what do we call two roads which connect but dont in fact cross each other, resembling letter T, for example?

    What are the differences between the words 'crossroads', 'junction', crossing' and 'intersection'?

    In the Czech language I dare to say we use the word crossroads for any of the above.

    Thanks for your time and relieving me of my pain of ignorance.

    CHeers.

    Waawe
    Last edited by Waawe; 02-Sep-2008 at 12:22.

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    #2

    Re: Giving directions

    Even a little help is help...

  1. Offroad's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: Giving directions

    Quote Originally Posted by Waawe View Post
    Hey,

    can we equally use the following without a difference in meaning?

    #1 Turn left / on the left / to the left

    #2 Take the next left / on the left / to the left
    take a look at this page BBC World Service | Learning English | How To

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    #4

    Re: Giving directions

    Thanks for your help, Marcio, yet, I still have no answer to my questions.

    May a native speaker assist?

    Cheers.

  2. BobK's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: Giving directions

    Quote Originally Posted by marciobarbalho View Post

    Quote Originally Posted by Waawe View Post
    Hey,

    can we equally use the following without a difference in meaning?

    #1 Turn left / on the left / to the left

    #2 Take the next left / on the left / to the left
    No you can't. I don't want to say 'one word' equals 'another word', because that's seldom true. But 'Turn left' is an instruction - quite like 'take the left'; note that they both use verbs. 'On the left' and 'to the left' are descriptive, referring to a point ('on') or an extent ('to'): 'On the left is a 'phone box'; but 'to the left you will see a row of poplar trees' (note - that's not a typo, it's a kind of tree - peuplier in French, choupo in Portuguese,... I can't help with the Czech!)

    Quote Originally Posted by Waawe View Post
    And one more question:

    Can we call 'crossroads' any place where two roads meet? Or do we have to use the name only for the instance when two roads really cross each other resembling letter X? If so, what do we call two roads which connect but dont in fact cross each other, resembling letter T, for example?

    What are the differences between the words 'crossroads', 'junction', crossing' and 'intersection'?

    In the Czech language I dare to say we use the word crossroads for any of the above.

    Thanks for your time and relieving me of my pain of ignorance.

    CHeers.

    Waawe
    junction - anywhere where roads meet (or railway lines, come to think of it: a big station to the south of London is called 'Clapham Junction'); but often referring to the sort in the shape of a T - called, in full, a 'T-junction'.
    crossroads - where two roads cross, usually at right-angles. When the roads meet and effectively cross, but not at a single point, it's a staggered junction
    crossing usually refers to a place where different forms of transport cross - a 'railway crossing', where a railway crosses a road at the same level (that is, without a tunnel or a bridge) - often called a 'level crossing'; or a 'pedestrian crossing' - often with white stripes painted on the road (informally, a 'zebra crossing'). I remember a safety jingle from my youth: "If you want to cross across a road, cross across a crossing".
    intersection probably American in origin, but used more and more in the UK, especially for large interchanges. Similarly, what in Br E is a 'roundabout' is in Am E a 'gyratory'; but this term is sometimes used for especially elaborate roundabouts. In NW London there's a system of roundabouts which before it was developed/elaborated/improved was just 'Hanger(sp?) Lane crossroads' but is now 'Hangar Lane Gyratory System'. There's also a notable one in Swindon, known colloquially as 'the Magic Roundabout' shaped roughly like this:


    o o
    o O o
    o o
    I expect the official name for that includes the words 'gyratory system'. Ask engee

    b
    Last edited by BobK; 04-Sep-2008 at 12:49. Reason: Added MR

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    #6

    Re: Giving directions

    Quote Originally Posted by BobK View Post

    No you can't. I don't want to say 'one word' equals 'another word', because that's seldom true. But 'Turn left' is an instruction - quite like 'take the left'; note that they both use verbs. 'On the left' and 'to the left' are descriptive, referring to a point ('on') or an extent ('to'): 'On the left is a 'phone box'; but 'to the left you will see a row of poplar trees' (note - that's not a typo, it's a kind of tree - peuplier in French, choupo in Portuguese,... I can't help with the Czech!)

    b
    Dear Bob, thanks for the traffic stuff explanation, Ill rememeber that.

    Unfortunately, your answer to my first question isnt clear to me.

    Let me re-ask you:

    Which of the the following is/are right?

    1/ When you come to the end of the street, turn right.
    2/ When you come to the end of the street, turn to the right.

    I can see now, we cant use on the right as it probably gives information where we should do the turn, which is nonsense in this context, as we need to know in which direction, not where.


    Which of the the following is/are right?

    1/ Keep straight on for about 100 metres and take the second street on the right.
    2/ Keep straight on for about 100 metres and take the second street right.
    3/ Keep straight on for about 100 metres and take the second street to the right.

    Thank you and patience with me.


  3. BobK's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: Giving directions

    Quote Originally Posted by Waawe View Post
    Dear Bob, thanks for the traffic stuff explanation, Ill rememeber that.

    Unfortunately, your answer to my first question isnt clear to me.

    Let me re-ask you:

    Which of the the following is/are right?

    1/ When you come to the end of the street, turn right.
    2/ When you come to the end of the street, turn to the right. Possible.

    I can see now, we cant use on the right as it probably gives information where we should do the turn, which is nonsense in this context, as we need to know in which direction, not where.


    Which of the the following is/are right?

    1/ Keep straight on for about 100 metres and take the second [street - optional ] on the right.
    2/ Keep straight on for about 100 metres and take the second [street] right. (OK without "street".)
    3/ Keep straight on for about 100 metres and take the second street to the right. Understandable, but 'on' sounds better to me.

    Thank you and patience with me.

    ('Over and out' for today.)

    b

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