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    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Czech
      • Home Country:
      • Czech Republic
      • Current Location:
      • Czech Republic

    • Join Date: Nov 2006
    • Posts: 71
    #1

    Cool jump / bounce

    Hello, IŽd like to ask a native speaker (UK preferred) if there is any different between jump and bounce when speaking about children or animals. Maybe, there is a slight difference of how the movement looks like? Is a jump higher than a bounce?

    Thanks for your explanation,

    Marketa.


    • Join Date: Oct 2006
    • Posts: 19,434
    #2

    Re: jump / bounce

    "Jump" indicates that the child is physically and of its own volition moving rapidly up and down.

    "Bounce" indicates that it is probably using something to assist the movement.

    However, informally they can both be used to describe a child's movements -

    The little girl was bouncing along the road, jumping over the cracks in the pavement.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Czech
      • Home Country:
      • Czech Republic
      • Current Location:
      • Czech Republic

    • Join Date: Nov 2006
    • Posts: 71
    #3

    Smile Re: jump / bounce

    Thank you, Anglika, I can understand now.

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