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  1. thedaffodils's Avatar
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    #1

    Smile Use of 'be a dear'

    Scenario:

    (Bree was talking her teenager son Andrew)

    Bree: Andrew, would you be a dear and make sure your sister's just breaking her own things?"

    Question:

    Could she talk her husband Peter as below about "be a dear"?

    Peter, would you be a dear and ...

    I mean whether it is okay to use "be a dear" to address other people but not kids. Thanks!

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    #2

    Re: Use of 'be a dear'

    Quote Originally Posted by thedaffodils View Post
    Scenario:

    (Bree was talking to her teenage son Andrew)

    Bree: Andrew, would you be a dear and make sure your sister's just breaking her own things?"

    Question:

    Could she talk to her husband Peter as below and say "be a dear"?

    Peter, would you be a dear and ...

    I mean whether it is okay to use "be a dear" to address people other than kids. yes, it's okay Thanks!
    2006

  2. thedaffodils's Avatar
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    #3

    Smile Re: Use of 'be a dear'

    Hi 2006,

    Thanks a bunch for your corrections and answer.

  3. thedaffodils's Avatar
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    #4

    Smile Re: Use of 'be a dear'

    Hi 2006,

    I am wondering whether 'naughty students', which I refer to at face value, sounds unnatural, to native speakers of North Americans, especially to Canadians?

    A Canadian formite told me it was chinglish, but she didn't explain. I knew 'naughty' is suggestive.

    Could you please answer this question for me? Thanks in advance!


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    #5

    Re: Use of 'be a dear'

    "naughty" would not generally be used in English in this way. It does not carry the more serious content that it appears to have in Chinglish, where I suspect it is a translation of a Chinese word that carries a strong moral implication.

  4. thedaffodils's Avatar
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    #6

    Smile Re: Use of 'be a dear'

    Hi Anglika,

    Thank you for the answer. Sorry, I don't follow.


    Quote Originally Posted by Anglika View Post
    "naughty" would not generally be used in English in this way.
    What way do you mean?


    It does not carry the more serious content that it appears to have in Chinglish, where I suspect it is a translation of a Chinese word that carries a strong moral implication.
    It was me who wrote 'naughty children'. And I didn't refer to any strong moral implication.

    Please click the URL link and read the read thread, especially the relevant post 2 &3.

    https://www.usingenglish.com/forum/g...ghty-kids.html
    Last edited by thedaffodils; 04-Sep-2008 at 16:20.


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    #7

    Re: Use of 'be a dear'

    Sorry - I may have misunderstood you. You wrote "naughty students" which is not a collocation I would expect, unless the writer is being a bit facetious. It is usually attached to children, with the implication that there is a deliberately mischievous behaviour. Students are generally considered too old for that.

  5. thedaffodils's Avatar
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    #8

    Smile Re: Use of 'be a dear'

    Quote Originally Posted by Anglika View Post
    Sorry - I may have misunderstood you. You wrote "naughty students" which is not a collocation I would expect, unless the writer is being a bit facetious. It is usually attached to children, with the implication that there is a deliberately mischievous behaviour. Students are generally considered too old for that.
    Thank you for your help, Anglika. I've understood.

  6. thedaffodils's Avatar
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    #9

    Smile Re: Use of 'be a dear'

    Quote Originally Posted by Anglika View Post
    Sorry - I may have misunderstood you.
    Hi Anglika,

    I am wondering how to respond to you politely, and in the other similar cases like this if someone said sorry to me, but I don't think it is your/their fault or mistake.

    Can I say "Needn't to say sorry, it is entirely not your fault."? Or is there any better or natural way to say?

    Thank you!

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