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  1. Offroad's Avatar
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    #1

    Smile Along came

    Please, dear teachers, could you shed a light on this?

    I'm trying to understand the meaning of the following sentence:

    Along came Ms Lana.

    What does 'along came' mean?
    Is it possible to say 'Along come Mr John' ?
    Is it possible to say 'Come/came along X' ? If so, what does it mean? Does it always refer to people?

    Thank you!


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    #2

    Re: Along came

    Along came/comes xxx = xxxx arrived/arrives.

    You can say "xxxx came along", but it is not as rhythmic in a song, and could have another meaning that xxx accompanied us.

    The phrase can be used with anything:

    "Along came the herd of horses, galloping past"

    "Oh, look, there's Dickie! Along comes trouble!"

    "As we drove up the motorway, along came the police car."

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    #3

    Re: Along came

    I wouldn't use a title efore a first name, but otherwise it's fine.

    Is it possible to say 'Come/came along X' ? No; you'd hacvge to put the subject back to the beginning. It can refer to non-human things- along came the sub-prime crisis.

  2. Offroad's Avatar
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    #4

    Smile Re: Along came

    Ok, thank you mates, so, are these sentences right?

    a) I can see Paula along coming.
    b) Whether you've been felling lonely, forget to pay the bills, no much longer someone will along come.
    c) My friend John's along coming, he's joining us on today's fishing.
    d) A friend of hers, Maria, is going to along come by 3 o'clock.


    Thank you for your efforts.

  3. BobK's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: Along came

    Quote Originally Posted by marciobarbalho View Post
    Ok, thank you mates, so, are these sentences right?

    a) I can see Paula [x] coming along.
    ...See below.
    c) My friend John's [x] coming along , he's joining us on today's fishing ^trip/excursion/outing....
    d) A friend of hers, Maria, is going to [x] come along by 3 o'clock.


    Thank you for your efforts.
    These three are generally OK, except for the word order. This one's not so straightforward:

    "b) Whether you've been feeling lonely, forget to pay the bills, no much longer someone will along come."

    This doesn't make sense. Do you mean "If you've been feeling lonely, just stop paying the bills; someone's bound to come around [better than "along" in this context] pretty soon"?

    Incidentally, here's another use of 'come along': 'Come along, the taxi's waiting.' [="Hurry up" or - informally - 'Get a move on'.]


    b

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    #6

    Re: Along came

    Marcio, you must watch "Along Came Polly"!

  5. BobK's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: Along came

    Afterthought: '<adverb> <verb>' (examples 'along came <subject>', 'down falls <subject>') is a word order typical of narratives - as in Tdol's example, and lots of nursery rhymes -

    'The maid was in the garden, hanging out the clothes,
    When down came a blackbird and pecked off her nose.

    (snopes.com: Pirates and Sing a Song of Sixpence )


    'Here comes a candle to light you to bed
    And here comes a chopper to chop off your head'.

    (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oranges...#Common_lyrics )

    b
    Last edited by BobK; 05-Sep-2008 at 14:38. Reason: Tweaked format; added 2nd example

  6. Offroad's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: Along came

    Quote Originally Posted by banderas View Post
    Marcio, you must watch "Along Came Polly"!
    I did.
    It was pretty funny.

  7. Offroad's Avatar
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    #9

    Re: Along came

    Quote Originally Posted by BobK View Post
    Afterthought: '<adverb> <verb>' (examples 'along came <subject>', 'down falls <subject>') is a word order typical of narratives - as in Tdol's example, and lots of nursery rhymes -

    'The maid was in the garden, hanging out the clothes,
    When down came a blackbird and pecked off her nose.

    'Here comes a candle to light you to bed
    And here comes a chopper to chop off your head'.

    b
    Ok, so, we may say:

    When down came a bird and pecked off someone's nose.
    ... and a bird came down and pecked off ....

    And here comes a chopper to ...
    and a choper comes here to ...

    Along came Polly
    Polly came along.

    I mean, the verb separates the subject from the adverb.

    Thank you all for the explanation, very nice.
    Last edited by Offroad; 05-Sep-2008 at 18:19.

  8. BobK's Avatar
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    #10

    Re: Along came

    Quote Originally Posted by marciobarbalho View Post
    Ok, so, we may say:

    When down came a bird and pecked off someone's nose.
    ... and a bird came down and pecked off ....

    And here comes a chopper to ...
    and a chopPer comes here to ...

    Along came Polly
    Polly came along

    I mean, the verb separates the subject from the adverb.

    Thank you all for the explanation, very nice.
    Interesting point. 'Along came" = "came along"; but 'here comes' doesn't mean exactly the same as "comes here". "Here comes" means "I can see there N/X who/which is coming this way. I think it's solved if you substitute the old word for 'to here' - "hither".

    b

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