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    #1

    Question off the beaten path

    Consider the two sentences below.

    It is an off the beaten path experience with great wine, great people, and great scenery that you won't soon forget.

    Unlike many similar Gold Rush-era outposts that are now ghost towns, Julian was simply too pretty to abandon, and this off-the-beaten-path destination is at its most charming during the fall apple harvest season.

    1) The two expressions have the same meaning?

    2) If so, why some people write it with hyphen?

  1. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: off the beaten path

    Quote Originally Posted by dilermando View Post
    Consider the two sentences below.

    It is an off the beaten path experience with great wine, great people, and great scenery that you won't soon forget.

    Unlike many similar Gold Rush-era outposts that are now ghost towns, Julian was simply too pretty to abandon, and this off-the-beaten-path destination is at its most charming during the fall apple harvest season.

    1) The two expressions have the same meaning?

    2) If so, why some people write it with hyphen?
    The hyphens are not necessary or correct.

  2. BobK's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: off the beaten path

    Quote Originally Posted by bhaisahab View Post
    The hyphens are not necessary or correct.
    Do you have a source for that prescription? There is a difference between 'a high level grill' [a grill that is both high and level - the sort of thing I would use at a barbecue (sometimes the grill is too low, so I put it on bricks - but have to make sure the bricks give it an even base ]) and 'a high-level grill'. There are different practices used in parts of the world.

    b

  3. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: off the beaten path

    Quote Originally Posted by BobK View Post
    Do you have a source for that prescription? There is a difference between 'a high level grill' [a grill that is both high and level - the sort of thing I would use at a barbecue (sometimes the grill is too low, so I put it on bricks - but have to make sure the bricks give it an even base ]) and 'a high-level grill'. There are different practices used in parts of the world.

    b
    Hi, Yes, I can agree with the high-level grill example but what, in your opinion, is the difference between "off the beaten path" and off-the-beaten-path, what do the hyphens signify?

  4. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: off the beaten path

    I have carried out a fairly extensive search and I only found one reference to Off-the-beaten-path, which seems to refer to some sort of travel company.

  5. BobK's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: off the beaten path

    Quote Originally Posted by bhaisahab View Post
    Hi, Yes, I can agree with the high-level grill example but what, in your opinion, is the difference between "off the beaten path" and off-the-beaten-path, what do the hyphens signify?
    They signify that the whole phrase, meaning "[that is] off the beaten path" is an adjective. The "high-level grill" example was a bit tongue-in-cheek (note my use of hyphens: my tongue was in my cheek when I thought of the example, but the phrase gets hyphens to indicate that it's an adjective.



    b

  6. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: off the beaten path

    Is this peculiar to the travel industry, the Americans, or perhaps the American travel industry?

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