Results 1 to 7 of 7
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Portuguese
      • Home Country:
      • Tuvalu
      • Current Location:
      • Tuvalu

    • Join Date: Oct 2007
    • Posts: 1,860
    #1

    pull hands

    hi,
    I heard a father saying to his son to "pull hands" with his uncle. did I hear right, please? does "pull hands" mean the same as "hold hands"?
    thanks.

  1. Soup's Avatar
    VIP Member
    English Teacher
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Canada
      • Current Location:
      • China

    • Join Date: Sep 2007
    • Posts: 5,882
    #2

    Re: pull hands

    I have never heard the phrase used to mean hold hands. It could be that the child doesn't like to hold hands--would rather be free and in control of his own movement--and so the family uses the phrase 'pull hands' as this has the child seeming leading the uncle, and therefore in control.

  2. Amigos4's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Oct 2007
    • Posts: 54,877
    #3

    Re: pull hands

    Quote Originally Posted by jctgf View Post
    hi,
    I heard a father saying to his son to "pull hands" with his uncle. did I hear right, please? does "pull hands" mean the same as "hold hands"?
    thanks.
    I believe the expression you might be looking for is 'pull my finger'. Wikipedia describes this meaning: Pull my finger is a joke or prank regarding flatulence in which a mark is asked to pull the finger of the illusionist (or person playing the joke), who simultaneously flatulates so as to suggest a causal relationship between the pulling of the finger and the subsequent expulsion of gas.

    Does this explanation help?

    Cheers,
    Amigo

  3. Soup's Avatar
    VIP Member
    English Teacher
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Canada
      • Current Location:
      • China

    • Join Date: Sep 2007
    • Posts: 5,882
    #4

    Re: pull hands

    amigos4, your post has reminded me of a rather good point. jctgf, what's the context?

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Portuguese
      • Home Country:
      • Tuvalu
      • Current Location:
      • Tuvalu

    • Join Date: Oct 2007
    • Posts: 1,860
    #5

    Re: pull hands

    Quote Originally Posted by Soup View Post
    amigos4, your post has reminded me of a rather good point. jctgf, what's the context?
    Hi there,
    The context is a fiction story by Stephen King. There's something odd and dangerous happening in the city.
    This specific dialog happens when a group of 3 people arrive at a grocery store and the father says to his son "Son, I'll have to [do something] now and I want you to be with Mr. Brown. I want you to pull his hand all the time.".
    The father wants to make sure that his son will be safe so he wants him to grab Mr. Brown's hand and keep holding it all the time. I probably heard it wrong but what I heard is "pull hand(s)".
    Probably it's a mistake on my part. Probably they said "hold hand".
    Thanks.

  4. Amigos4's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Oct 2007
    • Posts: 54,877
    #6

    Re: pull hands

    jctgf,

    In the context you describe it would be appropriate for the father to tell his son to pull Mr. Brown's hand; to maintain a secure/safe connection. However, common usage in the US would be 'hold Mr. Brown's hand'.

    Cheers,
    Amigo

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Polish
      • Home Country:
      • Poland
      • Current Location:
      • UK

    • Join Date: Mar 2007
    • Posts: 524
    #7

    Re: pull hands

    Hello,
    Just a learner opinion.

    The first thougth that crossed my mind have a literal meaning. Especially if his uncle was a narcoleptic. Father ask his son to pull, literally, his uncle hand to keep him awake.
    Cheers

Similar Threads

  1. to have another body taken off their hands, etc.
    By XINLAI-UE in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 06-Apr-2008, 19:15
  2. helpng hands or help hands?
    By bosun in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 22-Oct-2006, 00:49
  3. help hands or helping hands?
    By bosun in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 21-Aug-2006, 15:05
  4. in ... hands
    By Joe in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 19-Aug-2004, 03:46

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •