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    #1

    Smile a music question #3

    • Whiskey In The Jar
    (Originally By: Thin Lizzy)


    In the lines below, what do the words in bold mean?

    As I was goin' over the Cork and Kerry mountains
    I saw Captain Farrell and his money he was countin'
    I first produced my pistol and then produced my rapier
    I said stand and deliver or the devil he may take ya
    I took all of his money and it was a pretty penny
    I took all of his money yeah I brought it home to Molly
    She swore that she'd love me, never would she leave me
    But the devil take that woman for you know she treat me easy

    Musha rain dum-a-do-dum-a-da
    Whack for my daddy-o
    Whack for my daddy-o
    There's whiskey in the jar-o

  1. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: a music question #3

    This was an old traditional Irish song long before Thin Lizzy recorded it. The original words are;

    But the devil take that woman for you know she tricked me easy
    Musha ring dum-a-do-dum-a-da
    Work for my daddy-o


    What musha ring means I really don't know, but it looks like a possible corruption of Irish Gaelic words.

  2. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: a music question #3

    Here is a nice explanation I have found. This question has been on my mind, I studied Irish Gaelic part time for three years whilst living and working in the west of Ireland.

    "Musha ring um a do um a da" is very very similar sounding to these Irish words:
    Musha => M'uishe (my whiskey)
    ring um a => rinne me/ (rinne = past tense of "de/an" which is "do, make, perform, carry out, commit, turn out, reach, establish"; me/ = "I, me")
    do => don (from "do" + "an" = "to the, for the")
    um a da => amada/n (fool)

    which translates to "I made my whiskey for the fool." Which, as a translation, has the nice qualities that it follows correct Irish grammar and also follows stress rules for both sentences and individual words. It also has to do with whiskey, which is nice.
    Last edited by bhaisahab; 08-Sep-2008 at 08:15. Reason: afterthought

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    #4

    Smile Re: a music question #3

    Quote Originally Posted by bhaisahab View Post
    Here is a nice explanation I have found. This question has been on my mind, I studied Irish Gaelic part time for three years whilst living and working in the west of Ireland.

    "Musha ring um a do um a da" is very very similar sounding to these Irish words:
    Musha => M'uishe (my whiskey)
    ring um a => rinne me/ (rinne = past tense of "de/an" which is "do, make, perform, carry out, commit, turn out, reach, establish"; me/ = "I, me")
    do => don (from "do" + "an" = "to the, for the")
    um a da => amada/n (fool)

    which translates to "I made my whiskey for the fool." Which, as a translation, has the nice qualities that it follows correct Irish grammar and also follows stress rules for both sentences and individual words. It also has to do with whiskey, which is nice.
    Thanks bhaisahab. I doff my hat to you.

    One more question. Is "whack" a way to pronounce "work" in Irish Gaelic?

  3. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: a music question #3

    Quote Originally Posted by dilermando View Post
    Thanks bhaisahab. I doff my hat to you.

    One more question. Is "whack" a way to pronounce "work" in Irish Gaelic?
    No, but in some parts of Ireland "work" in Irish accented English could sound a bit like that, though I think it's just there because it was misheard, words in songs are often badly pronounced.

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