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    • Join Date: Feb 2008
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    #1

    but being ...

    Professor: The deeper the water, the lower the tsunami and the faster it moves. In the open ocean, it travels at about 700 kilometers per hour, but being sometimes no more than a meter in height, (Hello, I was wondering if someone could take a look for me at this sentence, this is my fisrt time to see a structure of a sentence like this [but being ...]. Could anyone offer me some useful explanation that may be help me get this one?) a tsunami often passes a ship unnoticed. This is what happened in 1896 during a catastrophic tsunami in Japan, which was the result of an undersea earthquake. Thousands of people were drowned onshore, while fishermen far out at sea did not notice the waves passing beneath their boats. But when they went home, they found their villages destroyed.

    Thanks for your help.


  1. Raymott's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: but being ...

    Quote Originally Posted by XINLAI-UE View Post
    Professor: The deeper the water, the lower the tsunami and the faster it moves. In the open ocean, it travels at about 700 kilometers per hour, but being sometimes no more than a meter in height, (Hello, I was wondering if someone could take a look for me at this sentence, this is my fisrt time to see a structure of a sentence like this [but being ...]. Could anyone offer me some useful explanation that may be help me get this one?) a tsunami often passes a ship unnoticed. This is what happened in 1896 during a catastrophic tsunami in Japan, which was the result of an undersea earthquake. Thousands of people were drowned onshore, while fishermen far out at sea did not notice the waves passing beneath their boats. But when they went home, they found their villages destroyed.

    Thanks for your help.

    The comma should come between but and being.
    "...it travels at about 700 kilometers per hour but, being sometimes no more than a meter in height,a tsunami often passes a ship unnoticed."
    being sometimes no more than a meter in height, means "since it is sometimes no more than a meter in height".
    When you have a phrase surrounded by commas, you should be able to remove the phrase and still have a sentence. The phrase is parenthetical.
    Another example:
    The child shouldn't have done it but, being young, he doesn't understand.



    • Join Date: Nov 2007
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    #3

    Re: but being ...

    Do you know about participial phrases? Such as:

    Taking his lead, the rest of the mob began to heckle the speaker.

    I had worked hard all day, and, being tired, I decided not to go out that night.


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    #4

    Re: but being ...

    Quote Originally Posted by Raymott View Post
    The comma should come between but and being.
    "...it travels at about 700 kilometers per hour but, being sometimes no more than a meter in height,a tsunami often passes a ship unnoticed."
    being sometimes no more than a meter in height, means "since it is sometimes no more than a meter in height".
    When you have a phrase surrounded by commas, you should be able to remove the phrase and still have a sentence. The phrase is parenthetical.
    Another example:
    The child shouldn't have done it but, being young, he doesn't understand.

    Thank you, Raymott.

    Your answer is pretty clear to me. I get it !


    • Join Date: Feb 2008
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    #5

    Re: but being ...

    [quote=Raymott;350614]The comma should come between but and being.
    "...it travels at about 700 kilometers per hour but, being sometimes no more than a meter in height,a tsunami often passes a ship unnoticed." (Raymott, could you take a look for at this sentence? I hope you can offer the explanation just like the other question answers I got it from you. I mean, could you fill in the words left out in this sentence. It is always pretty clear to me when you use this method. Thank you .)



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    #6

    Re: but being ...

    [quote=XINLAI-UE;350752]
    Quote Originally Posted by Raymott View Post
    The comma should come between but and being.
    "...it travels at about 700 kilometers per hour but, being sometimes no more than a meter in height,a tsunami often passes a ship unnoticed." (Raymott, could you take a look for at this sentence? I hope you can offer the explanation just like the other question answers I got it from you. I mean, could you fill in the words left out in this sentence. It is always pretty clear to me when you use this method. Thank you .)
    Sorry, I don't understand the question this time.
    The only words left out of the sentence are "In the open ocean,"
    If you're asking for an explanation of bit in red, you've already given an explanation - fishermen far out at sea did not notice the waves passing beneath their boats
    So, I'm not sure what to answer. Perhaps you could rephrase the question?


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    #7

    Re: but being ...

    [quote=Raymott;350879]
    Quote Originally Posted by XINLAI-UE View Post
    Sorry, I don't understand the question this time.

    Hi, Raymott,

    I mean I like you answer like this, for example, here is a question I asked.

    S: No redness or swelling, so it's no sign of infection. I'm gonna keep you on antibiotics for the next ten days. You should be good. Michael, you understand, by law, I'm obligated to file a report if I feel there's been prisoner misconduct. There's no way this injury happened by stepping on a blade in a garden shed.
    M: If you file a report, things could get a lot worse for me.
    S: They're not already?
    M: Not compared to what they could be. I've made some enemies.
    S: Yeah. You scared? ...

    Things aren't as bad for Michael as they could be.
    The sentences mean:
    M: If you file a report, things could get a lot worse for me. (Things are bad for me now)
    S: Things are not already bad for you?
    M: Yes, but they are notbad compared to what they could be. I've made some enemies.
    (When you fill in all thoes words omitted in these sentences, then that will be pretty clear and easy to me to get it. )

    Professor: The deeper the water, the lower the tsunami and the faster it moves. In the open ocean, it travels at about 700 kilometers per hour, but being sometimes no more than a meter in height, a tsunami often passes a ship unnoticed.

    If "unnoticed" is used as a adverb here, I have no question about this sentence. (I look it up, only unnoticed definition - Dictionary - MSN Encarta tells me "unnoticed" a adverb, all other dictionary both show that this word is an adjective) If "unnoticed" is an adjective, then I will get this sentence like: a tsunami often passes a ship that is unnoticed. Then I will get, a tsunami often passes a ship that we did not notice. (We did not notice the ship, not tsunami. It is weird.) And I will never understand this one like: fishermen far out at sea did not notice the waves passing beneath their boats. Unless "unnotice" is uses as a adverb here, that would be pretty clear to me that this sentence means: a tsunami often passes a ship without being observed / seen.

    Do I make it more clear this time?


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    #8

    Re: but being ...

    Quote Originally Posted by XINLAI-UE View Post
    Do I make it more clear this time?

    Yes, you want an explanation for the phrase underlined (not "left out").
    a tsunami often passes a ship unnoticed.
    It means that the tsunami passed unnoticed by the fisherman.
    "unnoticed" is an adjective.
    Compare:
    She went to bed hungry. The next day she left for work tired. She passed the workmen unnoticed.
    She was hungry, tired and unnoticed. These are all adjectives.
    The tsunami was unnoticed when it passed the ship.


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    #9

    Re: but being ...

    Quote Originally Posted by Raymott View Post
    Yes, you want an explanation for the phrase underlined (not "left out").


    I mean the words are left out from the original sentences.

    Thanks for your help, Raymott. I understand it this time !

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