Results 1 to 5 of 5

    • Join Date: Aug 2006
    • Posts: 20
    #1

    Which is the subject?

    In a sentence like

    "I thought the man was eating a pie",

    is 'I' the Subject, 'thought' the Verb, and 'the man was eating a pie' a Complement? If so what are the sub parts within this complement?

    It's strange because if there wasn't the 'I thought' at the beginning, 'the man' would be the subject, 'was eating' the verb and 'a pie' the object.

    Thanks for your help!


    • Join Date: May 2008
    • Posts: 810
    #2

    Re: Which is the subject?

    Quote Originally Posted by Federerexpress View Post
    In a sentence like

    "I thought the man was eating a pie",

    is 'I' the Subject, 'thought' the Verb, and 'the man was eating a pie' a Complement? If so what are the sub parts within this complement?

    It's strange because if there wasn't the 'I thought' at the beginning, 'the man' would be the subject, 'was eating' the verb and 'a pie' the object.

    Thanks for your help!
    I think, as you suspect, the man was eating a pie is a complement, or more specifically a complement clause. It is an argument of the predicate thought; therefore it should be analysed as a clause. The man is the subject of the complement clause.

    However I am not sure.

    Someone else will be able to give a definate answer.

    I am not a teacher.
    Last edited by colloquium; 09-Sep-2008 at 11:39.


    • Join Date: Aug 2006
    • Posts: 20
    #3

    Re: Which is the subject?

    Thanks for the reply colloquium, it was a good explanation!
    One more thing: am I correct in thinking that a clause can only have one subject but a sentence can have more than one subject?


    • Join Date: May 2008
    • Posts: 810
    #4

    Re: Which is the subject?

    Quote Originally Posted by Federerexpress View Post
    Thanks for the reply colloquium, it was a good explanation!
    One more thing: am I correct in thinking that a clause can only have one subject but a sentence can have more than one subject?
    Well a sentence can certainly have more than one subject.

    I spoke to richard and he explained the situation to me.

    There are clearly two subjects in this sentence: I and he.

    I am not sure if a clause can only have one subject.

    John and Richard went to the shop. (???)

    I'm also not sure if my original answer to your first question is correct.

    I wish someone would help!

  1. Raymott's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Australia
      • Current Location:
      • Australia

    • Join Date: Jun 2008
    • Posts: 24,091
    #5

    Re: Which is the subject?

    Quote Originally Posted by colloquium View Post
    Well a sentence can certainly have more than one subject.

    I spoke to richard and he explained the situation to me.

    There are clearly two subjects in this sentence: I and he.

    I am not sure if a clause can only have one subject.

    John and Richard went to the shop. (???)

    I'm also not sure if my original answer to your first question is correct.

    I wish someone would help!
    Someone will almost certainly correct you if you're wrong.
    The subject of the above sentence is "John and Richard".
    A clause has one subject and one main verb.

Similar Threads

  1. subject to
    By vil in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 17-Apr-2008, 13:58
  2. Subject and Predicate
    By sohala in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 16-Jan-2008, 07:39
  3. Whichever one of you
    By Grablevskij in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 28
    Last Post: 27-Aug-2007, 09:16
  4. Subject Noun
    By Farhaj in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 04-Mar-2005, 12:18
  5. Subject of a verb
    By Anonymous in forum Linguistics
    Replies: 10
    Last Post: 14-Oct-2003, 07:10

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •