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    • Join Date: Apr 2006
    • Posts: 24
    #1

    I don't want no ...?

    Hi,

    I found the following sentences confused me:

    • I don't want no trouble.
    • I don't want no disturbance.
    • I don't want no scrubs.
    • I don't want no problem.
    • I don't want no ........


    Two negative words (don't & no) in one sentence.
    Shouldn't they make the sentence become positive?
    How come the sentence still has a negative meaning?
    This really confuses me.
    Where's this usage come from?

    Thanks for helping.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Canada
      • Current Location:
      • Canada

    • Join Date: Apr 2007
    • Posts: 4,146
    #2

    Re: I don't want no ...?

    Quote Originally Posted by eliang View Post
    Hi,

    I found the following sentences confused me:

    • I don't want no trouble.
    • I don't want no disturbance.
    • I don't want no scrubs.
    • I don't want no problem.
    • I don't want no ........
    Two negative words (don't & no) in one sentence.
    Shouldn't they make the sentence become positive? Yes, that is the logical result.
    How come the sentence still has a negative meaning? Some people use it as a negative meaning, but that is not considered correct/acceptable English by most native speakers.

    Where's this usage come from? It comes from the fact that not all native speakers speak exactly the same English, and to some people it may be acceptable. But it is not standard English and is not spoken by most native speakers. Most would say 'I don't wany any (trouble)(disturbance)(etc).' and this is considered to be correct by most people
    I recommend that you use "any".

    Thanks for helping.
    2006

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