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    #1

    AS as a conjuction

    In the following, does the word "as" mean "because"? Thanks.

    This is a remarkable book. It is also remarkably easy to misunderstand its most important lessons. the author has conducted a study that compares mathematical understanding among U.S. and Chinese elementary school teachers as it relates to classroom teaching practices. What could be simpler? What could one possibly misconstrue? Let me count the ways.

  1. Raymott's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: AS as a conjuction

    Quote Originally Posted by ian2 View Post
    In the following, does the word "as" mean "because"? Thanks.

    This is a remarkable book. It is also remarkably easy to misunderstand its most important lessons. the author has conducted a study that compares mathematical understanding among U.S. and Chinese elementary school teachers as it relates to classroom teaching practices. What could be simpler? What could one possibly misconstrue? Let me count the ways.
    No, it doesn't mean "because" here.
    The phrase means "compares the teaching practices of US and Chinese teachers."
    "as it relates to" = "in the way it relates to" or "in the manner in which it relates to".

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    #3

    Re: AS as a conjuction

    Dear Raymott,

    Thanks for your reply. I have a follow-up question. The original basically compares understandings, not the practices, even though in effect, what is compared probably is practices. If I want to add UNDERSTANDING in my paraphrase, how to do that? The reason I want to add is that I don't want to jump too far so that students may have hard time understanding it. Thanks again in advance.

    Ian

    Quote Originally Posted by Raymott View Post
    No, it doesn't mean "because" here.
    The phrase means "compares the teaching practices of US and Chinese teachers."
    "as it relates to" = "in the way it relates to" or "in the manner in which it relates to".

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    #4

    Re: AS as a conjuction

    Quote Originally Posted by ian2 View Post
    Dear Raymott,

    Thanks for your reply. I have a follow-up question. The original basically compares understandings, not the practices, even though in effect, what is compared probably is practices. If I want to add UNDERSTANDING in my paraphrase, how to do that? The reason I want to add is that I don't want to jump too far so that students may have hard time understanding it. Thanks again in advance.

    Ian
    I'm not sure I understand your question - but I think you want to paraphrase the original sentence, with "understanding" in it?
    How about:
    ... a study that compares mathematical understanding of U.S. and Chinese elementary school teachers, and how that understanding relates to classroom teaching practices.

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