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    #1

    "better not to" vs "better don't"

    Hello,

    Are there any differences in usage, meaning etc, of better not to and better don't?


    Cheers;


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    #2

    Re: "better not to" vs "better don't"

    Quote Originally Posted by Jaskin View Post
    Hello,

    Are there any differences in usage, meaning etc, of better not to and better don't?


    Cheers;
    Better not is an idiom/semi-modal; it requires had and takes the bare infinitive; to is not needed. It expresses obligation.

    You had better not leave.

    He had better not work late tonight.

    Better don't is ungrammatical and, therefore, not possible.

    I am not a teacher.

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    #3

    Re: "better not to" vs "better don't"

    hello,
    Thank you for your prompt repy.
    But ...
    1. I didn't ask about had better ony about better not to
    2.
    Quote Originally Posted by colloquium View Post
    Better don't is ungrammatical and, therefore, not possible.
    I've seen that on the BBC websiete:(I think it's a strong argument for "better don't" being grammatical.)

    It remembered me the article I saw in one of my English text book about the same subject ( yours was more complete ) and I liked it . And I think it's better don't think about how much cosmetic product , we ( women) will use from the cradle to the grave .
    An another example:
    link
    Science is by definition, a learning process. Pronouncements of certainty from people who really should know better don't help.
    Cheers,

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    #4

    Re: "better not to" vs "better don't"

    Hello,
    I think it's a good idea to post some example of "better not to" to clarify what I meant.
    The examples are from BBC website.

    It's better not to concentrate on the same subject for too long.

    Or do you reckon that it's better not to know what to expect before you audition?

    In that case it's better not to kill any cubs in case they were yours.


    Cheers,

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    #5

    Re: "better not to" vs "better don't"

    Quote Originally Posted by Jaskin View Post
    I've seen that on the BBC websiete:(I think it's a strong argument for "better don't" being grammatical.)
    Did you notice that the first one was posted by Shu from Japan, as a comment on the article? Anyone can write a "letter to the editor".

    It's no grammatical argument at all.

    An another example:
    link

    Cheers,
    "Science is by definition, a learning process. Pronouncements of certainty from people who really should know better don't help."

    This sentence doesn't use the phrase "better don't". It uses the phrases "people who should know better" and "don't help".
    People who should know better (subject) don't help (verb)

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    #6

    Re: "better not to" vs "better don't"

    Quote Originally Posted by Jaskin View Post
    Hello,
    I think it's a good idea to post some example of "better not to" to clarify what I meant.
    The examples are from BBC website.

    It's better not to concentrate on the same subject for too long.

    Or do you reckon that it's better not to know what to expect before you audition?

    In that case it's better not to kill any cubs in case they were yours.


    Cheers,
    These are all correct.
    "better don't" is grammatically wrong.

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    #7

    Re: "better not to" vs "better don't"

    Hello,

    My mistake.
    Thank you all.

    Cheers,


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    #8

    Re: "better not to" vs "better don't"

    Quote Originally Posted by Jaskin View Post
    Hello,

    My mistake.
    Thank you all.

    Cheers,
    Sorry Jaskin, I misundertood what you meant by better not to.

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