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  1. Melisa85's Avatar

    • Join Date: Sep 2008
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    #1

    Ambigous sentences

    Flying planes can be dangerous.
    Flying planes (S) can be (predicate or V) dangerous (object compliment).

    How to analyze it on another way?? And is it possible or the difference is only in meaning.

    Thanx

  2. Neillythere's Avatar
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    • Join Date: Mar 2008
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    #2

    Re: Ambigous sentences

    Hi Melisa

    As a Brit, but not a teacher, I believe that your sentence, in its present form, could be considered as theoretically ambiguous, but would probably only be read, by an NES, one way i.e. :
    "[The act/practice of] flying (i.e. driving) planes can be dangerous."

    It could possibly, however, be read, by a non-NES, to mean:
    "Flying planes/objects (i.e. rather than stationary planes/objects) can be dangerous."
    This, as you can see, would have a totally different meaning.

    Hope this helps
    Regards
    NT

  3. Raymott's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: Ambigous sentences

    Quote Originally Posted by Neillythere View Post
    only be read, by an NES, one way i.e. :
    "[The act/practice of] flying (i.e. driving) planes can be dangerous."

    It could possibly, however, be read, by a non-NES, to mean:
    Hi Neilly,
    Speaking of ambiguities, is NES a British abbreviation for native English speaker?
    In Australia, NESB mean non-English-speaking background.
    Thanks.

  4. Raymott's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: Ambigous sentences

    Quote Originally Posted by Melisa85 View Post
    Flying planes can be dangerous.
    Flying planes (S) can be (predicate or V) dangerous (object compliment).

    How to analyze it on another way?? And is it possible or the difference is only in meaning.

    Thanx
    This reminds me of:
    Time flies like an arrow.
    Fruit flies like a banana.

  5. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: Ambigous sentences

    Quote Originally Posted by Raymott View Post
    This reminds me of:
    Time flies like an arrow.
    Fruit flies like a banana.

    Time flies! but they move so fast and I don't have a stopwatch!

  6. Raymott's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: Ambigous sentences

    Quote Originally Posted by bhaisahab View Post
    Time flies! but they move so fast and I don't have a stopwatch!
    Hmmm



    • Join Date: Oct 2006
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    #7

    Re: Ambigous sentences

    Quote Originally Posted by bhaisahab View Post
    Time flies! but they move so fast and I don't have a stopwatch!

  7. Melisa85's Avatar

    • Join Date: Sep 2008
    • Posts: 47
    #8

    Re: Ambigous sentences

    Quote Originally Posted by Neillythere View Post
    Hi Melisa

    As a Brit, but not a teacher, I believe that your sentence, in its present form, could be considered as theoretically ambiguous, but would probably only be read, by an NES, one way i.e. :
    "[The act/practice of] flying (i.e. driving) planes can be dangerous."

    It could possibly, however, be read, by a non-NES, to mean:
    "Flying planes/objects (i.e. rather than stationary planes/objects) can be dangerous."
    This, as you can see, would have a totally different meaning.

    Hope this helps
    Regards
    NT
    thank you a lot, now some things came to their place..

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