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      • Bulgaria
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      • Bulgaria

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    #1

    on the pay-roll = on the staff

    Der teachers,

    Would you be kind enough to tell me whether I am on the right track by the interpretation of the expression in bold in the following sentence?

    John Salveson, a principal at headhunting firm Salveson Stetson Group (Salveson Stetson Group) says there are several reasons why companies launch external searches even when they have strong candidates already on the payroll.

    on the pay-roll = on the staff

    Would you also tell me what it is preferable?

    They enter me on the pay-roll. or

    They take me on the staff.

    Thank you for your efforts.

    Regards,

    V


    • Join Date: May 2008
    • Posts: 810
    #2

    Re: on the pay-roll = on the staff

    Quote Originally Posted by vil View Post
    on the pay-roll = on the staff

    Would you also tell me what it is preferable?

    They put me on the pay-roll. or

    They put me on the staff.


    V

    A verb I often hear in this context is put.

    However I am not 100% sure it is considered the best choice.

    I am not a teacher.


    • Join Date: Oct 2006
    • Posts: 19,434
    #3

    Re: on the pay-roll = on the staff

    Quote Originally Posted by vil View Post
    Der teachers,

    Would you be kind enough to tell me whether I am on the right track by the interpretation of the expression in bold in the following sentence?

    John Salveson, a principal at headhunting firm Salveson Stetson Group (Salveson Stetson Group) says there are several reasons why companies launch external searches even when they have strong candidates already on the payroll.

    on the pay-roll = on the staff

    Would you also tell me what it is preferable?

    They enter me on the pay-roll. or

    They take me on the staff.

    Thank you for your efforts.

    Regards,

    V
    Neither is quite right:

    They take/took me on.
    They put me on their pay-roll.

    • Member Info
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      • Bulgarian
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    #4

    Re: on the pay-roll = on the staff

    Dear teachers,

    Thank you for you vectoring (launching) and encouraging advices.

    What do you think about the following sentences concerning the matter in question?

    They agreed to take me on for three months.

    They appointed me to an office.

    They appointed me to a post.

    He was appointed as a general executive of the Bank of America.

    He was assigned to the Unated Nations Organization.

    He has been designated to take over the position of a deputy-manager.

    Regards.

    V.

  1. bhaisahab's Avatar
    • Member Info
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    • Join Date: Apr 2008
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    #5

    Re: on the pay-roll = on the staff

    They are all good vil.


    • Join Date: May 2008
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    #6

    Re: on the pay-roll = on the staff

    Quote Originally Posted by Anglika View Post
    Neither is quite right:

    They take/took me on.
    They put me on their pay-roll.
    Here's an example of "on the payroll":

    Flash forward: Taylor Swift | Music | The Observer
    Sony put her on the payroll at 14.


    • Join Date: May 2008
    • Posts: 1,157
    #7

    Re: on the pay-roll = on the staff

    They agreed to take me on for three months.

    "Take someone on / take on someone" means "to start to employ someone," doesn't it?


    • Join Date: Jul 2009
    • Posts: 2,036
    #8

    Re: on the pay-roll = on the staff

    Quote Originally Posted by Daruma View Post
    They agreed to take me on for three months.

    "Take someone on / take on someone" means "to start to employ someone," doesn't it?
    I wouldn't say "start to employ". I would just say it means "employ". But, yes, you are correct. One easily infers that the time of taking on a new employee is the start of one's employment, so it's not necessary to say "start" in order to define the expression.


    • Join Date: May 2008
    • Posts: 1,157
    #9

    Re: on the pay-roll = on the staff

    Merriam-Webster's Learner's Dictionary
    ▪ Her company has over 3,000 employees on the payroll.

    Can I say "its" in place of the?

    ▪ He's currently on the payroll of a small law firm.

    Can I say "his" in place of the?


    • Join Date: Jul 2009
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    #10

    Re: on the pay-roll = on the staff

    Quote Originally Posted by Daruma View Post
    Merriam-Webster's Learner's Dictionary
    ▪ Her company has over 3,000 employees on the payroll.

    Can I say "its" in place of the?

    ▪ He's currently on the payroll of a small law firm.

    Can I say "his" in place of the?
    ▪ Her company has over 3,000 employees on the payroll.

    Can I say "its" in place of the? < It's grammatically correct, but I like "the" in this sentence better. It's the thing again: it sounds more usual, typical, or natural.


    ▪ He's currently on the payroll of a small law firm.

    Can I say "his" in place of the? < It would be correct in a structural or grammatical way, but it would be strange. I don't recommend it. This goes beyond not sounding usual, typical, or natural. It would be very odd to use "his" in place of "the" in this sentence.

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