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    • Join Date: Jul 2008
    • Posts: 7
    #1

    None of them / None of which????

    i don't know how to use none of them and none of which.....

    what is the difference between them????

    for example.

    The Consumer Council has tested 300 types of hair-dryers, none of _____ passed the safety tests.

    the ans is none of them...

    i don't know why none of which is incorrect...

    Can anyone teach me clearly????

    Much obliged!!!


    • Join Date: Nov 2007
    • Posts: 5,409
    #2

    Re: None of them / None of which????

    The two possible forms are:

    1. The Consumer Council has tested 300 types of hair-dryers, none of which passed the safety tests.

    When, in a sentence, you add further information to what you have just written, we can use a non-defining clause beginning with a preposition,

    So:"..300 types of hair-dryers, none of which passed the safety tests.
    or "300 types of hair-dryers, of which none passed the safety tests.
    "The young remain in the pouch for 7 weeks, by which time they have grown..."
    In your sentence, 'which' is a relative pronoun referring directly back to "300 types of hair-dryers"

    2. The Consumer Council has tested 300 types of hair-dryers, and none of them passed the safety tests.

    Here, the 'additional information' is given in a linking clause beginning with 'and'. We could have written:
    "The Consumer Council has tested 300 types of hair-dryers, and none/not one passed the safety tests."

    To use 'none of them' without the linking conjuction 'and', we would have to write:
    The Consumer Council has tested 300 types of hair-dryers, none of them passing the safety tests.

    Check that in typing your full sentence above, you did not omit the 'and'.
    Otherwise, I also cannot understand why the 'preferred' answer is 'none of them'.
    Last edited by David L.; 13-Sep-2008 at 16:12.

  1. BobK's Avatar
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    • Join Date: Jul 2006
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    #3

    Re: None of them / None of which????

    Yes, do check. If there's no "and" your advice was wrong.

    b


    • Join Date: Jul 2008
    • Posts: 7
    #4

    Re: None of them / None of which????

    Quote Originally Posted by BobK View Post
    Yes, do check. If there's no "and" your advice was wrong.

    b
    SORRY!!!!!

    the correct ans is none of which-.-


    • Join Date: Jul 2008
    • Posts: 7
    #5

    Re: None of them / None of which????

    i don't know why :

    -The Consumer Council has tested 300 types of hair-dryers, and none of them passed the safety tests.

    -The Consumer Council has tested 300 types of hair-dryers, none of them passing the safety tests.

    i don't know why " and ,passed " using at the same time..
    but using passing after omiting "and"


    • Join Date: Jul 2008
    • Posts: 7
    #6

    Re: None of them / None of which????

    Push!!!

  2. BobK's Avatar
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      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • UK

    • Join Date: Jul 2006
    • Posts: 16,038
    #7

    Re: None of them / None of which????

    Quote Originally Posted by anthony_ball View Post
    i don't know why :

    -The Consumer Council has tested 300 types of hair-dryers, and none of them passed the safety tests.

    -The Consumer Council has tested 300 types of hair-dryers, none of them passing the safety tests.

    i don't know why " and ,passed " using at the same time..
    but using passing after omiting "and"
    The first is in effect two sentences: 'The CC has....' 'None of them passed...' If you want to join them (as 'co-ordinate clauses'), you need to use ", and". The ", and" gives the sign [Here comes another finite verb]. Read more here: Finite verb - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    The second is one sentence ('The CC has...), with a subordinate clause giving extra information about the tests in question. The participle 'passing' is not a finite verb, so ", and" would give the wrong message.

    b

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