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    #1

    have finished vs finish

    I'm reading an interesting book at the moment. I will lend it to you when I've finished it.

    Can i rewrite the latter sentence as 'I will lend it to you when I finish it'?

    Please correct me if am wrong.

    Thanks in advance:)

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    #2

    Smile Re: have finished vs finish

    Quote Originally Posted by kiranlegend View Post
    I'm reading an interesting book at the moment. I will lend it to you when I've finished it.

    Can i rewrite the latter sentence as 'I will lend it to you when I finish it'?

    Please correct me if am wrong.

    Thanks in advance:)
    They roughly mean the same.

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    #3

    Re: have finished vs finish

    thank you.. can you please explain why the usage of present perfect is also correct?

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    #4

    Re: have finished vs finish

    I'm not a teacher.

    Hi kiranlegend,

    'When' means 'at that moment, at that time, etc.'. Notice the different tenses used in relationship to the clause beginning with when. It is important to remember that 'when' takes either the simple past OR the present - the dependent clause changes tense in relation to the 'when' clause.

    • He was talking on the phone when I arrived.
    • When she called, he had already eaten lunch.
    • I washed the dishes when my daughter fell asleep.
    • We'll go to lunch when you come to visit.


    What time will you call me tonight?

    I’ll call you when I get home from work. “I’ll call you when I get homr from work” is a sentence with two parts. “I’ll call you” (the main part) and “when I get home from work”(the when part). The sentence is future (tonight), but you cannot use “will” or “going to” in the when part of the sentence. Instead we use a present tense, usually simple present (to do)


    I can’t talk to you now. I’ll talk to you later when I have more time.

    You can also use the present perfect (I have done) after “when” to show that the first action will be finished before he second.

    When I have read this book, you can have it.

    It is often possible to use either the simple present or the present perfect.

    You’ll feel better when you have something to eat. or

    You’ll feel better when you have had something to eat.

    Regards,

    V.
    Last edited by vil; 16-Sep-2008 at 20:08.

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    #5

    Re: have finished vs finish

    It is often possible to use either the simple present o the preent perfect.

    You’ll feel better when you have something to eat. -- this is simple present or

    You’ll feel better when you have had something to eat. -- this is present perfect

    Am i correct in identifying the tenses above?


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    #6

    Re: have finished vs finish

    I will lend it to you when I've finished it.

    Can i rewrite the latter sentence as 'I will lend it to you when I finish it'?


    Yes. Remember, the choice of tense depends on the perspective of the speaker.

    'when I finish it.' 'when' in this context means 'after'.
    This is a black and white statement: Is the reading of the book finished? Yes or no? It is an objective, detached view of the situation.

    |<.....reading the book....>|finish|<.....not reading....>
    The time before and the time after are not relevant to the speaker.
    I am simply stating that there will come a point in time when I finish reading the book...and after that, he can have it.

    'when I have finished' - again, 'when' = 'after'
    Here, I am viewing the reading of this book in terms of a period of time, from when I started, to where I'm up to in the book, and indicating that there will be a time in the future when I am finished:
    |<...started reading, have not finished...>|speaking|<...continue reading...>.........finished
    I am speaking from the perspective of being more involved in the reading of this book, remembering from when I first started reading it, and where I'm up to, and still more to read. I see it as an ongoing activity,where 'still reading it'= 'unfinished' and you must wait for me to read more and so finish it.
    Last edited by David L.; 16-Sep-2008 at 19:40.

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