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    #1

    Gerunds

    I am having a bit of difficulty working out exactly how to recognise a Gerund when it is in sentence

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    #2

    Smile Re: Gerunds

    Quote Originally Posted by beelzeebub View Post
    I am having a bit of difficulty working out exactly how to recognise a Gerund when it is in sentence
    I'm absolutely sure you're not the only one having to struggle with the issue.

    The gerund (or the verbal noun) is the present participle form of the verb (i.e. the -ing form), used as a noun in a sentence. You can use it in all the places that you might normally use a noun.

    The gerund can function just like any other noun in a sentence:

    1. as a subject: Driving is not easy for everyone.
    2. as the complement of the verb be: My hobby is playing darts.
    3. as an object after certain verbs: She doesn't like dancing.
    4. after prepositions to make a prepositional phrase: She left without saying a thing.


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    #3

    Re: Gerunds

    I'm not a teacher.

    Hi Beelzeebub,

    In most cases the diffentiation between the gerund and the participle does not present any difficulty.

    Unlike the participle the gerund may be preseded by a preposition, it may be modified by a noun in the possessive case or by a possessive pronoun; it can be used in the function of a subject, object, and predicative. In the function of an attribute and of an adverbial mofifier both the gerund and the participle may be used, but the gerund in these functions is always preceded by a preposition.

    There are acses, however, when the differentiation between the gerund and the participle presents some difficulty; for instance, it is not always easy to distinguish between a gerund as part of a compand noun and a paericiple used as an attribute to a noun. One should bear in mind that if we have a gerund as part of a compound noun, the person or thing denoted by the noun does not perform the action expressed by the ing- form.: e.g. a dancing-hall (a hall for dancing), a cooking-stove (a stove for cooking), walking shoes, a writing-table, wtc.

    If we have a participle used as an attribute the person denoted by the noun performes the action expressed by the ing- form: e.g. a dancing girl, (a girl who dances), a singing child, etc.

    The gerund should not be confused with the verbal noun, which has the same suffix –ing.

    The main points of difference between the gerund and the verbal noun are as follows:

    1. Like all the verbals the gerund has a double character – nominal and verbal

    1a. The verbal noun has only a nominal character.

    2. The gerund is not used with am article.

    2a. The verbal noun may be used with an article.

    The making of a new humanity cannot be the privilege of a handful of burocrats.

    I want you to give my hair a good brushing.

    3. The gerund has no plural form.

    3a. The verbal noun may be used in the plural.

    Our likings are regulate by our circumstances.

    4. The gerund of a transitive verb takes a direct object.

    He received more and more letters, so many that he had given up reading them.

    4a. A verbal noun cannot take a direct object; it takes a prepositional object with the preposition “of”.

    Meanwhile Gwendoline was rallying her nerves to the reading of the paper.

    5. The gerund may be modified by an adverb.

    Drinking, even temperately, was a sin.

    5a. The verbal noun may be modified by an adjective.

    He (Tom) took a good scolding about clodding Sid.

    Regards,

    V.

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