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  1. kingsley1989
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    #1

    whereof one cannot speak, thereof one must be silent

    Please help explain the functions of the words "whereof" and "thereof" in the sentence above, thx! And is there anymore adj or adv. which are combined words like "whereof" and "thereof"?
    I think they are cool to use!

    If possible, it would be best if anyone can replace the two words with simpler words! Thx again


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    #2

    Re: whereof one cannot speak, thereof one must be silent

    Quote Originally Posted by kingsley1989 View Post
    Please help explain the functions of the words "whereof" and "thereof" in the sentence above, thx! And are there any other adjectives or adverbs which are combined words like "whereof" and "thereof"?
    I think they are cool to use!

    If possible, it would be best if anyone can replace the two words with simpler words! Thanks again
    They are archaic and only used now in legal documents.

    You could paraphrase this as: That which you cannot talk about you must be silent about.

  2. BobK's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: whereof one cannot speak, thereof one must be silent

    Quote Originally Posted by kingsley1989 View Post
    ...And is there anymore adj or adv. which are combined words like "whereof" and "thereof"? Many, many - all archaic.
    I think they are cool to use!

    If possible, it would be best if anyone can replace the two words with simpler words! Thx again

    "We should just shut up, since we can't say anything useful."
    That's a fairly loose translation.

    Quote Originally Posted by Anglika View Post
    They are archaic and only used now in legal documents.

    ...


    Examples: Herein, hereof, hereto ...
    And why stop at one preposition?
    Other examples: hereinbefore, hereinafter. As they're mostly used in legal documents, those "here-" variants are the only 'multiples' I've met (in phrases like '...hereinafter referred to as The Company...') But it would, if necessary, be possible to unravel the meaning of, say 'whereinbefore'.

    Incidentally, because Christians believe in life after death - hereafter - you may come across the noun 'the hereafter' meaning the afterlife (in current speech).

    b

    PS Don't be worried by all those apparent diphthongs. Pronounce these compound words as - say - "here-after".
    Last edited by BobK; 17-Sep-2008 at 12:24. Reason: Added PS

  3. BobK's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: whereof one cannot speak, thereof one must be silent

    Afterthought

    Another not-too-archaic one that you may come across in fairly recent literature is "where[up]on" - meaning '[immediately] after that': 'The veiled figure uncovered her face, whereupon he let out a gasp: 'But it's you, Miriam'".

    You'd sound very 'dusty' if you used it in conversation, but it hasn't entirely died out in some writing.

    b

  4. BobK's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: whereof one cannot speak, thereof one must be silent

    And another related thing. There's big difference between therefor: Definition from Answers.com and therefore: Definition from Answers.com - apart from the stress (dee-dah as against dah-dee). They are almost exact opposites:

    "A therefore B" = "B; the reason therefor is A"

    This is a good reason for steering clear* of (=avoiding) 'therefor', and getting the spelling and the stress right when you use "therefore".

    b

    PS *Except, in the company of suckers, the knowledge might win you a drink or two

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