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  1. retro's Avatar
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    #1

    exclude (deliberately?)

    Hi

    I was wondering if 'exclude' is only used when you deliberately are not including something. If so, should we say something is not included or you left something out when you accidentaly are not including something?

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    #2

    Re: exclude (deliberately?)

    You can exclude something unintentionally, but the word usually has a negative connotation. It better to say, omit.

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    #3

    Re: exclude (deliberately?)

    Yes, it's a strong way of saying "left out." It is deliberate.

    When the invitations went out, we excluded all his relatives.

  2. retro's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: exclude (deliberately?)

    Quote Originally Posted by mykwyner View Post
    You can exclude something unintentionally, but the word usually has a negative connotation. It better to say, omit.
    I heard that 'omit' is formal. Can we use it when the listener is a friend?

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    #5

    Re: exclude (deliberately?)

    With a friend, informally?

    Let's leave him out of it.

    Cut him from the list.

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