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  1. gayanah's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Armenian
      • Home Country:
      • Armenia
      • Current Location:
      • Armenia

    • Join Date: Aug 2008
    • Posts: 7,171
    #1

    on time

    Dear teachers!

    When do we use "on time"?

    When do we use "in time"?

  2. LwyrFirat's Avatar

    • Join Date: Sep 2007
    • Posts: 343
    #2

    Re: on time

    Imagine that you have an appointment with your friend, he told you that "I will be waiting for you between 15:30 -16:00,after 16:00 I'll leave the place".

    If you arrive there at 15:45 you are in time


    But if the appointment time is exactly 16:00 and

    if you arrive there at 16:00 you are on time


    Briefly for in time there is a time period but for on time there is an exact time.

    Not a teacher.
    Last edited by LwyrFirat; 19-Sep-2008 at 16:26.


    • Join Date: Nov 2007
    • Posts: 5,409
    #3

    Re: on time

    'in time' means that you are not late for something; have made a deadline.

    The train was leaving at 5 p.m. and my taxi was held up in traffic. I thought I might miss the train, but I made it just in time.

    I had to go overseas on a business trip and was worried that if it took longer than I hoped, I would miss my nephew's 21st birthday party. Fortunately, it all went well and I was back in time for the party.

    (There is another meaning to 'in time' which is not relevant here.)

  3. gayanah's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Armenian
      • Home Country:
      • Armenia
      • Current Location:
      • Armenia

    • Join Date: Aug 2008
    • Posts: 7,171
    #4

    Re: on time

    Quote Originally Posted by David L. View Post
    'in time' means that you are not late for something; have made a deadline.

    The train was leaving at 5 p.m. and my taxi was held up in traffic. I thought I might miss the train, but I made it just in time.

    I had to go overseas on a business trip and was worried that if it took longer than I hoped, I would miss my nephew's 21st birthday party. Fortunately, it all went well and I was back in time for the party.

    (There is another meaning to 'in time' which is not relevant here.)
    Thanks a lot.
    And what about "on time"? Is there any difference?


    • Join Date: Apr 2008
    • Posts: 1,571
    #5

    Re: on time

    Quote Originally Posted by gayanah View Post
    Thanks a lot.
    And what about "on time"? Is there any difference?
    'In time' is related to an event, while 'on time' - to a numeric value on the time axis.
    E.g. We were in time for dinner.
    We agreed to meet at seven, and he came on time.


    • Join Date: Nov 2007
    • Posts: 5,409
    #6

    Re: on time

    To add a little to what Clark has posted, 'on time' means 'punctual; punctually', at the time expected.

    A train is due to leave at 5 p.m. and does so: the train is on time.


    • Join Date: Nov 2007
    • Posts: 301
    #7

    Re: on time

    Not a teacher!
    There's already been a discussion about it. You can find it here:
    https://www.usingenglish.com/forum/i...time-time.html

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