Results 1 to 4 of 4
  1. montthom
    Guest
    #1

    correct verb?

    Since when have newscasters started saying, "John Doe went missing today . . . "
    I thought one "went to the store" or "went shoppping" but when John Doe could not be found, perhaps he was "reported missing today . . . "

    And when will weather forcasters learn the difference between "further" and "farther?"

    Someone, please help me lower my blood pressure!!

  2. Soup's Avatar
    VIP Member
    English Teacher
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Canada
      • Current Location:
      • China

    • Join Date: Sep 2007
    • Posts: 5,882
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #2

    Re: correct verb?

    Quote Originally Posted by montthom View Post
    Since when have newscasters started saying, "John Doe went missing today . . . "
    I thought one "went to the store" or "went shoppping" but when John Doe could not be found, perhaps he was "reported missing today . . . "
    ... "to go missing" to mean "disappear," as in a person or object that at one moment is available and visible and subsequently is nowhere to be found.

    "Disappear" doesn't perfectly convey this idea -- it has too much of a Siegfried and Roy, presto-chango connotation -- but, along with its slightly more melodramatic counterpart, "vanish," it had to do the job for a long time. "Go missing" is better, but it was resisted, probably for the very reason that it sounds so British. Along with variants "went missing" and "gone missing," it appeared in The New York Times not at all in 1983, and only twice in 1993.

    In 2001, however, the formulation was employed 24 times. The reason was a major national story about a person who went missing: Chandra Levy. And that year was the tipping point. In 2003, the Times had precisely 50 "go missings," and today even writers for USA Today and People use it with a straight face.

    Source The Chronicle: 6/18/2004: American Idioms Have Gone Missing

    Quote Originally Posted by montthom
    And when will weather forcasters learn the difference between "further" and "farther?"

    Someone, please help me lower my blood pressure!!
    Some authorities (like the Associated Press) insist on “farther” to refer to physical distance and on “further” to refer to an extent of time or degree, but others treat the two words as interchangeable except for insisting on “further” for “in addition,” and “moreover.” You’ll always be safe in making the distinction; some people get really testy about this.

    Source farther/further

  3. Raymott's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Australia
      • Current Location:
      • Australia

    • Join Date: Jun 2008
    • Posts: 23,270
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #3

    Re: correct verb?

    Quote Originally Posted by montthom View Post
    Since when have newscasters started saying, "John Doe went missing today . . . "
    I thought one "went to the store" or "went shoppping" but when John Doe could not be found, perhaps he was "reported missing today . . . "

    And when will weather forcasters learn the difference between "further" and "farther?"

    Someone, please help me lower my blood pressure!!
    If John Doe hadn't gone anywhere, he couldn't be missing. You never hear "John Doe stayed at home missing today". So, "he went missing". It's a collocation. How would you prefer to hear it? "He became missing?", "He was found missing?" - no that's an oxymoron. "He was noticed missing?"
    But that's an entirely different thing from being reported missing. He could have gone missing yesterday.

  4. Soup's Avatar
    VIP Member
    English Teacher
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Canada
      • Current Location:
      • China

    • Join Date: Sep 2007
    • Posts: 5,882
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #4

    Re: correct verb?

    Quote Originally Posted by Raymott View Post
    How would you prefer to hear it? "He became missing?", "He was found missing?" - no that's an oxymoron. "He was noticed missing?"
    But that's an entirely different thing from being reported missing. He could have gone missing yesterday.
    Actually, the phrase in question is went missing today, and the idiom truly is somewhat of an oddity semantically.

Similar Threads

  1. correct verb tense
    By Unregistered in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 28-Mar-2008, 06:16
  2. correct verb
    By kohyoongliat in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 11-Jan-2007, 03:54
  3. Correct verb use
    By Carol Sikler in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 17-Aug-2005, 20:48
  4. Are All IELTS Answers Correct?
    By artast in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 10-Aug-2005, 01:46
  5. correct form of verb
    By akbar in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 07-Aug-2005, 13:44

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •