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  1. SunMoon's Avatar

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    #1

    Question Answering to a friend...?

    I am answering to a friend who I worked with and saying that he is surprised as my time was so brief. He wrote:

    ...bit surprised as your time here was so brief.

    I would answer joking like this:

    Do not worry, I could always come back as Chief Executive!

    Does it work?

  2. SunMoon's Avatar

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    #2

    Unhappy Re: Answering to a friend...?

    I think that this my post is past without to being seen...

  3. BobK's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: Answering to a friend...?

    Quote Originally Posted by SunMoon View Post
    I think that this my post is past without [to] being seen...
    'this my post' is a rather Italian way of putting it. Nowadays we would omit the first determiner: 'my post'. The old way of putting a possessive between a determiner and its noun is preserved only in quotations from old texts/verbal formulas - like, in one form of the grace before meals, the phrase 'these thy benefits' - or in rhetoric (where there is often a big pause - or as musicians say - a 'gran' pausa' ) 'It will be very hard saying goodbye to these... my friends after 40 years at Lehmann's'; in that case, the "these" and the "my" don't really belong together, they just happen to be next to each other.

    Quote Originally Posted by SunMoon View Post
    I am answering [to]* a friend who I worked with and saying that he is surprised as my time ^there^ was so brief. He wrote:

    ...bit surprised as your time here was so brief.

    I would answer joking like this:

    Do not worry, I could always come back as Chief Executive!

    Does it work?
    Your joke is fine; maybe use the abbreviation 'CEO', but it's fine as it is. (On second thoughts, it sounds a bit 'stand-offish'/aloof/unwelcoming to say 'do not'. Most people would just say 'Don't worry'.)

    *When you answer to someone you take orders: 'Don't tell me what I can and can't do. You're not my boss and I don't answer to you.' So you are indeed 'sending an answer to' your friend, but you are just answering him.

    b
    Last edited by BobK; 24-Sep-2008 at 11:05. Reason: Added rhetorical example

  4. SunMoon's Avatar

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    #4

    Question Re: Answering to a friend...?

    I would change my answer in this way:

    Don't being worried for my time there was so brief, I could always come back as CEO!

    Is it correct?

  5. BobK's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: Answering to a friend...?

    Quote Originally Posted by SunMoon View Post
    I would change my answer in this way:

    Don't [being] worry[ied for] about my time there [was] being so brief, I could always come back as CEO!

    Is it correct?
    Nearly - I've made a few changes. The bits in red are wrong.

    You could also say 'Don't worry that my time there was so brief.' You can't use 'worry for' except when you worry about something going wrong for someone: 'I'm worried for Emily; she's never been away from home this long.'

    b

  6. SunMoon's Avatar

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    #6

    Question Re: Answering to a friend...?

    Thank you for keeping answering.

    Seeing your suggestions I am encouraged to write more than a drop line. I wrote a larger letter for answering to* that my friend. It would be:

    Hello xxxx

    Don't worry about my time there being so brief.

    Even though it was a great opportunity for me, I accepted that role for gathering experience in the UK work world and for practising my English language in the sector where I worked for over 15 years.

    Companyname gave me the opportunity to gain new experience, I studied and analysed the biggest worldwide outsourcing contract, I studied the entire xxxxx production and relevant processes including the newest xxxx. And over all, I appreciated to find a new friend!

    I believe that Companyname should be a good challenge for me but not in positions like that. I could explain something about my last days there but I think it should not much polite. Is friendname still working there, I mean within Companyname?

    However I could always come back as CEO!

    All the best


    Is it possible to proofread it?

    * TO - is it correct in that case?
    Last edited by SunMoon; 24-Sep-2008 at 15:37. Reason: Missed the question

  7. SunMoon's Avatar

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    #7

    Red face Re: Answering to a friend...?

    I inflated this post with just a bit of air for the question that is past without being seen...

  8. BobK's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: Answering to a friend...?

    Quote Originally Posted by SunMoon View Post
    Thank you for keeping answering.

    Seeing your suggestions I am encouraged to [write more than a drop line] do more than drop him a line (A *'drop line' isn't a noun - at least, not in Br English). I wrote a [larger]- it is larger, but you mean "longer"** letter for answering to* [that] my friend. It would be:

    Hello xxxx

    Don't worry about my time there being so brief.

    Even though it was a great opportunity for me, I took on the job so that [I could get experience in the UK world of work and practise my English [language] in the sector where I had already worked for over 15 years.

    Companyname gave me the opportunity to gain new experience, I studied and analysed the world's biggest outsourcing contract, I studied xxxxx production throughout its stages/thoroughly/in detail and relevant processes including the newest xxxx. And abover all, I was lucky enough/had the good fortune to find a new friend!

    I believe that Companyname [should] would be a good challenge for me but not in positions like that. I could [explain] say something about my last days there but I think it should not [much] very polite. Is friendname still working there, I mean within Companyname?

    However I could always come back as CEO!

    All the best


    Is it possible to proofread it?

    * TO - is it correct in that case?
    Nope - sorry. 'Answering my friend's email' or 'sending an answer to my friend', or even 'sending my friend an answer'.

    b

    PS** For people interested in etymological byways; less advanced students can safely ignore this!

    There is an idiom, 'writ large', which means something like 'given emphasis [often in some visible way]'. This was a quotation from a user of English 100s of years ago when:
    • writ was the past participle of write
    • large still had the sense of the Italian largo

    With reference to a newly fashionable version of Christianity, where the officials were called 'presbyters', the writer (I think it may have been Sheridan) wrote (iambically) 'New "presbyter" is but old "priest" writ large'. He meant, using the old sense of 'large', 'There's no significant difference between the new presbyters and the old priests; it's just a longer word'.

    But this sense of "large" now exists only in that quotation, and many (if not most) users don't know either that it's a quotation or that 'large' doesn't mean 'large' in that phrase; they think it means 'written in big letters'.

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