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  1. beachboy's Avatar
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    #1

    to outwit

    Does the verb to outwit necessarily have a negative connotation, i.e., trying to make a fool of somebody, or playing a trick?

  2. Raymott's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: to outwit

    Quote Originally Posted by beachboy View Post
    Does the verb to outwit necessarily have a negative connotation, i.e., trying to make a fool of somebody, or playing a trick?
    No, not necessarily. It just means to come up with a better strategy so that you win. If you lose in a game of Scrabble, you can say "You've outwitted me". I suppose losing carries a negative connotation, but it depends what the stakes are.

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