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    #1

    expressive modalities

    Hi,everyone. Would you please tell me what "expressive modalities" actually means? And can we say "expressive modalities of superstitions in the novel"?
    Thanks.


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    #2

    Re: expressive modalities

    Quote Originally Posted by ohmyrichard View Post
    Hi,everyone. Would you please tell me what "expressive modalities" actually means? And can we say "expressive modalities of superstitions in the novel"?

    Thanks.
    My student wants to write a graduation paper on the novel The Bonesetter's Daughter by Amy Tan, a famous Chinese American novelist. In this novel, there are numerous China images which are used to enhance its artistic effect. My student has read some essays by mainland Chinese scholars and perhaps has come across the term "expressive modalities" in an abstract or a title or somewhere else. But now she is unable to retrieve it. Yesterday,when she had the oral defense of her proposal for the paper she will compose in the next few months,one of the judges on the panel asked her about the meaning of the term mentioned above and she felt at a loss. Today, I googled it and got some hints but still am not sure of what it accutally refers to and whether it can be used in such a literary critism situation. And this is why I came here for your assistance. Could you think of something else to express the intended meaning if you find "expressive modalities" has never been used by native speaker?

    expressive modalities - WordReference Forums
    It's another way of saying modes of expression; expressive media: art, drawing, scuplture, collage, dance, movement, and language:
    2.2 Channels and Modes
    Now that we understand language as a subset of communication, we can further
    explore a few more ideas about language. To begin, let’s consider the three possible
    language channels. Language Channels are the three basic ways of expressing language:
    signed, spoken, and written. English can be expressed in two channels (written English
    and spoken English) while American Sign Language is most commonly expressed in one
    channel (signed ASL) but may also be expressed in one of several writing systems
    proposed for ASL (although none are widely used at this time). Channels are distinct
    from Modes.

    In the previous section we explored the five primary modes of expressing
    communication: image, odor, sound, taste, and texture. Only three expressive modalities
    are used to express language: image, sound, and texture. These three expressive
    modalities again match to our senses, which detect the elements of language. Languages
    are generally perceived and understood through the senses of sight, hearing, or touch.
    While it is clearly possible to communicate through food or perfume, we will exclude the
    senses of taste and smell from our discussion of modalities related to language.
    Channels and Modes are related, but not as a one-to-one match. Generally, a spoken
    language is encoded through sound; written and signed languages are encoded through
    images. But spoken languages can be written in phonetic alphabets or encoded visually ...

    Expressive Modalities are not limited to language use. We saw in the previous
    chapter that they are available for all forms of communication: music uses sound;
    paintings use images (and some paintings of Elvis also use texture – velvet). It is quite
    possible, even common, to use an encoding modality without using language. For
    example, an infant’s random gestures, babbling, and occasional physical contact with a
    caregiver would be examples of using all three encoding modalities (images, sounds, and
    textures) but expressing no language at all through any of them. The child may certainly
    communicate, but the requirements that define language (such as being rule-governed and
    shared by a community) have not been met – at least, not yet.
    In order to communicate, however, we must “express and ...


    Read more here http://www.handandmind.org/TIH1Chapter02.pdf

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    #3

    Re: expressive modalities

    Quote Originally Posted by Soup View Post
    It's another way of saying modes of expression; expressive media: art, drawing, scuplture, collage, dance, movement, and language:
    2.2 Channels and Modes
    Now that we understand language as a subset of communication, we can further
    explore a few more ideas about language. To begin, let’s consider the three possible
    language channels. Language Channels are the three basic ways of expressing language:
    signed, spoken, and written. English can be expressed in two channels (written English
    and spoken English) while American Sign Language is most commonly expressed in one
    channel (signed ASL) but may also be expressed in one of several writing systems
    proposed for ASL (although none are widely used at this time). Channels are distinct
    from Modes.

    In the previous section we explored the five primary modes of expressing
    communication: image, odor, sound, taste, and texture. Only three expressive modalities
    are used to express language: image, sound, and texture. These three expressive
    modalities again match to our senses, which detect the elements of language. Languages
    are generally perceived and understood through the senses of sight, hearing, or touch.
    While it is clearly possible to communicate through food or perfume, we will exclude the
    senses of taste and smell from our discussion of modalities related to language.
    Channels and Modes are related, but not as a one-to-one match. Generally, a spoken
    language is encoded through sound; written and signed languages are encoded through
    images. But spoken languages can be written in phonetic alphabets or encoded visually ...

    Expressive Modalities are not limited to language use. We saw in the previous
    chapter that they are available for all forms of communication: music uses sound;
    paintings use images (and some paintings of Elvis also use texture – velvet). It is quite
    possible, even common, to use an encoding modality without using language. For
    example, an infant’s random gestures, babbling, and occasional physical contact with a
    caregiver would be examples of using all three encoding modalities (images, sounds, and
    textures) but expressing no language at all through any of them. The child may certainly
    communicate, but the requirements that define language (such as being rule-governed and
    shared by a community) have not been met – at least, not yet.
    In order to communicate, however, we must “express and ...


    Read more here http://www.handandmind.org/TIH1Chapter02.pdf
    Thanks a lot, Soup. The exerpt you included in your post helped me gain a better understanding of the terms. So, you mean my student can have either "Expressive Modalities of Superstitions in the Novel" or "Expressive Modes of Superstitions in the Novel" as a subheading, right?
    Thanks.

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