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  1. oceanlola
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    #1

    which is correct?

    I want to say "15 years to date" or "15 years to present" Which phrase is correct? Or does either one work?

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    #2

    Re: which is correct?

    Quote Originally Posted by oceanlola View Post
    I want to say "15 years to date" or "15 years to present" Which phrase is correct? Or does either one work?
    Do you mean 'in the last 15 years'? (= from 15 years ago until now)


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    #3

    Re: which is correct?

    I am filling out a registration for a nonprofit. The application says
    (state the period of its "the organization" duration)

    so should I say 15 years/15 years to date/15 years to present?

    the other says
    (state the term of its"the organizations" existence if other than perpetual)

    again 15 years to date or 15 years to present?

    thank you to whoever helps me out.

  2. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: which is correct?

    '15 years to date' in both cases.

  3. Raymott's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: which is correct?

    Quote Originally Posted by oceanlola View Post
    I am filling out a registration for a nonprofit. The application says
    (state the period of its "the organization" duration)

    so should I say 15 years/15 years to date/15 years to present?

    the other says
    (state the term of its"the organizations" existence if other than perpetual)

    again 15 years to date or 15 years to present?

    thank you to whoever helps me out.
    What's wrong with just "15 years". If they wanted the duration up until 2010 or as at 2000, they would have asked for it that way. I guess you will have to sign and date the form. That will be the date from which the 15 years is applied.

    I don't understand the second question. Does "perpetual" mean it has always existed, or it will always exist? Could "15 years" here mean that you envisage it to last another 15 years?

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