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    #1

    set off

    I SET OFF for work at seven-thirty.

    hi,
    i am trying to understand what ''set off'' means, please. the dictionary says ''to start a journey''.
    1) does the sentence above mean the same as ''i leave my home and head to work at seven-thirty''?
    2) can i say ''wake up early! tomorrow we are setting off to Ottawa at 4 a.m.''?
    thanks.


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    #2

    Re: set off

    Quote Originally Posted by jctgf View Post
    I SET OFF for work at seven-thirty.

    hi,
    I am trying to understand what ''set off'' means, please. The dictionary says ''to start a journey''.
    1) Does the sentence above mean the same as 'I leave my home and head to work at seven-thirty''?
    2) Can I say ''We will have to wake up early tomorrow as we are setting off for Ottawa at 4 a.m.''?
    thanks.
    Yes and yes

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    #3

    Re: set off

    Quote Originally Posted by Anglika View Post
    Yes and yes
    Hi Angika,
    I noticed you corrected "set off to" to "set off for" but I found many "set of to" on COCA. Do you think that "to" is the right way in the American English?
    Thanks.

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    #4

    Re: set off

    I'm not a teacher.

    Hi gctgf,

    set off = begin a journey, leave, as in

    “When do you set off for Europe?”

    set-off: Definition from Answers.com

    Regards,

    V.

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    #5

    Re: set off

    Quote Originally Posted by vil View Post
    I'm not a teacher.

    Hi gctgf,

    set off = begin a journey, leave, as in

    “When do you set off for Europe?”

    set-off: Definition from Answers.com

    Regards,

    V.

    Hi,

    I have a stubborn doubt about "to set off to". It seems to be possible, according to COCA. I wonder if it really is.

    A few excerpts from COCA:

    So we set off to Russia to check up ...

    ... and he had set off to the village, to visit Mrs. Ishak, a ...

    ... he set off to London to patch up the differences among
    ...

    Thanks!


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    #6

    Re: set off

    Quote Originally Posted by jctgf View Post
    Hi Angika,
    I noticed you corrected "set off to" to "set off for" but I found many "set of to" on COCA. Do you think that "to" is the right way in the American English?
    Thanks.
    Possibly - you need an American to confirm that.

    Perhaps the references on COCA were along the lines of "we set off to go to xxxx".

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