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    #1

    up to mischief / get into mischief

    Hi!
    I am learning the usage of " up to mischief" and " get into mischief."
    If I know a little boy is like the figure Tom of the novel title:The Adventures Of Tom Sawyer , which written by Mark Twain and the little boy I would like to mention always makes trobles at school ,e.g. fight with classmates, destroy someone else's stuff, or pull some girls' long hair for fun and play harmless trick on classmates etc , but basically he is a kind boy
    , may I say : He is always up to mischief.
    or He always gets into mischief.
    What a mischievous/ naughty boy.
    Is my usage in the sentence right?
    Could you correct for me ?
    Thank you very much!
    Last edited by WUKEN; 29-Sep-2008 at 10:46.


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    #2

    Re: up to mischief / get into mischief

    He's a mischief-maker. He gets up to mischief. He will eventually get into trouble.

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    #3

    Re: up to mischief / get into mischief

    Thanks for your help!
    But my source says it's different from the word mischief and the word you mentioned : mischief- maker.
    so I would be very appreciate if someone else offers the answer to me.
    Thanks a lot!
    Last edited by WUKEN; 28-Sep-2008 at 13:51.


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    #4

    Re: up to mischief / get into mischief

    Quote Originally Posted by WUKEN View Post
    Thanks for your help!
    But my source says it's different from the word mischief and the word you mentioned : mischief- maker.
    so I would be very appreciate if someone else offers the answer to me.
    Thanks a lot!
    #

    What is different? Mischief maker = a maker of mischief.

    Your sentences all use mischief correctly #2 should read "He always gets into mischief"], although mischievous and naughty are not identical in meaning. A mischievous boy is not necessarily naughty, and a naughty boy is very likely not simply being mischievous.

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    #5

    Re: up to mischief / get into mischief

    Thanks for Anglika's clarification!!!
    I thought the two words are the same meaning.
    So I understand that the words naughty and mischief have slightly different now.
    Last edited by WUKEN; 29-Sep-2008 at 11:09.

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