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  1. thedaffodils's Avatar
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    #1

    Smile citadel (2 Questions)

    The City markets were screaming like Stuka divebombers. Rolling newscasters were starting to whinney. And the citizens of our land were becoming sick with worry for their life savings.

    This moment bawled out for some leadership but from the citadel in London came little save befogged, pillow-smothered, strap-biting confusion.
    Q1: screaming like Stuka divebombers=plunge, nosedive?

    Does the following sentences make sense? Which sentence is better?

    #1 Chinese stocks market is screaming like Stuka dive bombers.

    #2 Chinese stocks market nosedives.

    Q2: What does 'citadel' refer to?

    Many thanks!

    QUENTIN LETTS: Cameron proved a supremo of tone and composure | Mail Online
    Last edited by thedaffodils; 01-Oct-2008 at 13:43. Reason: what-->which


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    #2

    Re: citadel (2 Questions)

    Quote Originally Posted by thedaffodils View Post
    Q1: screaming like Stuka divebombers=plunge, nosedive?
    Yes - very fast and very noisily.

    Does the following sentences make sense? What sentence is better? The second one, but with the changes I have made in your first one, that is a lively image!

    #1 The Chinese stocks market is screaming downwards like Stuka dive bombers.

    Q2: What does 'citadel' refer to? The Conservative headquarters.

    Many thanks!
    .

  2. thedaffodils's Avatar
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    #3

    Smile Re: citadel (2 Questions)

    This moment bawled out for some leadership but from the citadel in London came little save befogged, pillow-smothered, strap-biting confusion.
    Hi Anglika,

    Thank you for your help. Could you please answer the questions that follow for me? Thanks!

    I don't really understand the sentence I quoted, especially its stucture, in this post.

    (1) What is the subject of bawled out?

    (2) What is the subject of 'came'? Is the sentence inverted? Is 'save' a noun or a verb?


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    #4

    Re: citadel (2 Questions)

    Quote Originally Posted by thedaffodils View Post
    Hi Anglika,

    Thank you for your help. Could you please answer the questions that follow for me? Thanks!

    I don't really understand the sentence I quoted, especially its stucture, in this post.

    (1) What is the subject of bawled out? "This moment"

    (2) What is the subject of 'came'? Is the sentence inverted? Is 'save' a noun or a verb? The subject of "came" is "little". "save" here is in fact a preposition, meaning "except" or "other than". Little came from the citadel other than befogged, pillow-smothered, strap-biting confusion
    .

  3. thedaffodils's Avatar
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    #5

    Smile Re: citadel (2 Questions)

    Anglika:

    Thank you very much for your help again.

    I had thought 'this moment' was an adverbial phrase. I still don't understand why "this moment" can be subject here. "bawl out" means tell sb off. Why does the time can tell sb off?

    Another example, this moment ate ice cream.

    I think it missed a subject: this moment I ate ice cream.


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    #6

    Re: citadel (2 Questions)

    In this article "This moment bawled out for" = "This moment cried out vigorously for". The author is using "bawl" in the sense of loud crying [like a child in a temper].

    "Moment" is the noun = an exact point in time, qualified by "this" identifying it as a very specific moment, and therefore is can be the subject.

  4. thedaffodils's Avatar
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    #7

    Smile Re: citadel (2 Questions)

    Quote Originally Posted by Anglika View Post
    In this article "This moment bawled out for" = "This moment cried out vigorously for". The author is using "bawl" in the sense of loud crying [like a child in a temper].

    "Moment" is the noun = an exact point in time, qualified by "this" identifying it as a very specific moment, and therefore is can be the subject.

    Thank you for your reply, Anglika.

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