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    #1

    still and yet (3)

    Tonight's English-language debate is likely Stéphane Dion's last chance to make a first impression on an electorate that polls suggest have yet to tune into his campaign.

    Hi,
    In this sentence "yet" is used in a affirmative sentence. Shouldn't it be "still"? Can both be used, please?
    Thanks.


    • Join Date: Oct 2006
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    #2

    Re: still and yet (3)

    Rephrase it as polls suggest have not yet tuned into his campaign and you will see that "still" cannot be used instead.

    • Member Info
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    #3

    Re: still and yet (3)

    Quote Originally Posted by Anglika View Post
    Rephrase it as polls suggest have not yet tuned into his campaign and you will see that "still" cannot be used instead.

    Thanks.

    When you put the sentence in the negative form it is clear that "yet" is the right choice. My problem, however, is with the original sentence that is in the affirmative mode. I am trying hard but I don't understand why "yet" is used in the original sentence (despite knowing that the sentence is right).
    I have found all four forms on COCA: "I still/yet have ...", "I have still/yet ..." and they all seem to have basically the same meaning to me.

    Thanks.
    Last edited by jctgf; 03-Oct-2008 at 04:45.


    • Join Date: Oct 2006
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    #4

    Re: still and yet (3)

    I would regard the original sentence as essentially negative. Something has not been done.

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