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    • Join Date: Jul 2008
    • Posts: 34
    #1

    Stop short at

    <My sweet and respected teachers> "shut him up" or "made him shut up" which one is right? And "i stopped short at telling him" what does it mean? Regards!

  1. #2

    Re: Stop short at

    You should go for the second one. "To shut somebody up" is ungrammatical. Whilst "to make someone shut up" is perfectly correct.

    You can also say "to get somebody to shut up" and "to cause somebody to shut up"

    Regards.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Bulgarian
      • Home Country:
      • Bulgaria
      • Current Location:
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    • Join Date: Sep 2007
    • Posts: 5,000
    #3

    Re: Stop short at

    Im not a teacher.

    Hi twilit,

    Your second question And "i stopped short at telling him" what does it mean? stands in need of a synonymous answer. There are a few words concerning the matter in question.

    stop short = cause someone to stop speaking, as in

    I was about to tell them the date when my father stopped me short.

    stop short of. Not go so far as to do or say something. For example,

    He may embroider the truth but he stops short of actually lying.

    stop short of doing something

    1. to decide not to do something.

    I stopped short of telling him what I really felt about him.

    Regards,

    V.

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