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    #1

    type of predicate

    Dear teachers,

    Would you be kind enough to tell me what grammatical form at a matter of fact are the expressions in bold in the following sentences?

    1. The parents of these children went hungry that their children might eat well.
    2. Her son had not only come home, but he had come a good person.
    3. The snow fell soft on his face and hair.
    4. The hare was lying dead beside the bird.
    5. She was sitting sentinel till the carriage should arrive.
    6. The flags in the square hung wet from the white poles.
    7. He resigned his office and died an old man.
    8. He looked strained and worried.
    9. “Hello Mary,” Erik said simply. “You’re looking fine.” “I’m feeling fine” she replied.
    10. It sounds beautiful, but I don’t understand it. Your scientific slang is beyond me.
    11. This is a new kind of medicine. This will taste bad.
    12. The house seemed strange without him.
    13. He appeared bigger, colossal, very old.
    14. I thought he might prove useful.
    15. It turned out a great success.
    16. “I’ll act as interpreter,” I said.

    Thank you for your efforts.

    Regards,

    V.
    Last edited by vil; 08-Oct-2008 at 16:10.

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    #2

    Re: type of predicate

    Did you teacher suggest this site for your homework?


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    #3

    Re: type of predicate

    Quote Originally Posted by vil View Post
    Dear teachers,

    Would you be kind enough to tell me what grammatical form at a matter of fact are the experssions in bold in the following sentences?

    1. The parents of these children went hungry that their children might eat well.
    2. Her son had not only come home, but he had come a good person.
    3. The snow fell soft on his face and hair.
    4. The hare was lying dead beside the bird.
    5. She was sitting sentinel till the carriage should arrive.
    6. The flags in the square hung wet from the white poles.
    7. He resigned his office and died an old man.
    8. He looked strained and worried.
    9. “Hello Mary,” Erik said simply. “You’re looking fine.” “I’m feeling fine” she replied.
    10. It sounds beautiful, but I don’t understand it. Your scientific slang is beyond me.
    11. This is a new kind of medicine. This will taste bad.
    12. The house seemed strange without him.
    13. He appeared bigger, colossal, very old.
    14. I thought he might prove useful.
    15. It turned out a great success.
    16. “I’ll act as interpreter,” I said.

    Thank you for your efforts.

    Regards,

    V.
    Vil, it is not clear what your problem is with these. Can you be more explicit about what puzzles you?

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    #4

    Re: type of predicate

    Hi Anglika,

    There are a simple predicate and a compound predicate as well as mixed types of predicate in English language.

    As can be seen from the term itself the compound predicate consist of two parts: a finite verb and some other part of speech: a noun, a pronoun, an adjective, a verbal etc.

    The first part expresses the verbal categories of person, number, tense, aspect, mood and voice; besides it has a certain lexical meaning of its own. The compound predicate may be nominal or verbal.

    The second component is the significant part of the predicate.

    The compound nominal predicate consists of a link verb and a predicative( the latter is also called the nominal part of the predicate).

    The link verb expresses the verbal categories of person, number, tense, aspect, mood, sometimes voice but as a result of a long development, have partly lost their original concrete mening. Many of these verbs can be used both as verbs of complete predication fully preserving their concrete meaning and as link verbs.

    There are some verbs which though fully preserving their concrete meaning perform the function of link verbs: they are used with a predicative and form a compound nominal predicate.

    The predicative is the significant part of the compound nominal predicate. It can be expressed by a noun, an adjective, a pronoun, a numeral, a prepositional phrase, an infinitive, a gerund, a participle or an adverb.

    There are many intangible arguments concerning the matter in question.

    For example:

    He stood steel. but He was still.

    He seemed angry. but He seemed to understand.

    I stand alone in the world. = I am alone in the world.

    Regards,

    V.

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