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    • Join Date: Sep 2008
    • Posts: 11
    #1

    Are those phrases correct?

    Hello to everyone! I need some help..
    Are those phrases correct?Thanks for your help and time!!

    "I can't find a solution for this problem"

    "I practise the piano everyday"

    "Please don't scream I want to read a book"

    "I never swear"

    "I keep away from this house"


    • Join Date: Nov 2007
    • Posts: 5,409
    #2

    Re: Are those phrases correct?

    "I can't find a solution for this problem"
    This is correct, if you are researching books or journals in search of the answer that someone else came up with (e.g. some major structural engineering problem that had to be tackled and solved when building a bridge or other structure) and finding out how they solved the problem would assist you ; or the 'answer page' at the back of a book (for problems or exercises presented for solution in the text) is missing.

    If you yourself are trying to work out a solution to a problem and can't do it, then you would say:

    "I can't find a solution to this problem"

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
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      • United States
      • Current Location:
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    • Join Date: Oct 2008
    • Posts: 1,211
    #3

    Re: Are those phrases correct?

    "I practise the piano everyday"
    Some would say practise is misspelled. Especially the British among us. However, the American and generally Canadian audience would agree with you. An easy mnemonic (mental trick) is "Ice is a noun and uses a C; Is is a verb and uses an S."

    Otherwise, the problem is in "everyday." That's an adjective ("It's an everyday occurrence"); you want to say, "every day." When in doubt, try substituting the name of a day. "practise everyTuesday" just doesn't cut it!

    "Please don't scream I want to read a book"
    This needs some separating punctuation, depending on what you want to say or emphasize. "Please don't scream! I want to read a book" is probably best. Or a period instead of an exclamation mark. Or, you could use a colon if the second part is a reason or example (not likely) or a semicolon if you wanted to tie them together very closely (not likely either, in this case). But you do need something!

    "I never swear"
    Good!

    "I keep away from this house"
    This is hard to imagine. If you keep away, then it's not "this" but rather "that" house. You aren't close enough to refer to it as "this." You might say, "I would keep away from this house" if you were in or near the house at the time. But if you are telling us your practice, you are probably pointing to it from a mountain far away.

    If it's on a picture board in front of you, and there are three houses in the photo, you can point to the offending house and in that case your sentence would be correct.



    • Join Date: Sep 2008
    • Posts: 11
    #4

    Re: Are those phrases correct?

    Quote Originally Posted by jlinger View Post
    "I practise the piano everyday"
    Some would say practise is misspelled. Especially the British among us. However, the American and generally Canadian audience would agree with you. An easy mnemonic (mental trick) is "Ice is a noun and uses a C; Is is a verb and uses an S."

    Otherwise, the problem is in "everyday." That's an adjective ("It's an everyday occurrence"); you want to say, "every day." When in doubt, try substituting the name of a day. "practise everyTuesday" just doesn't cut it!

    "Please don't scream I want to read a book"
    This needs some separating punctuation, depending on what you want to say or emphasize. "Please don't scream! I want to read a book" is probably best. Or a period instead of an exclamation mark. Or, you could use a colon if the second part is a reason or example (not likely) or a semicolon if you wanted to tie them together very closely (not likely either, in this case). But you do need something!

    "I never swear"
    Good!

    "I keep away from this house"
    This is hard to imagine. If you keep away, then it's not "this" but rather "that" house. You aren't close enough to refer to it as "this." You might say, "I would keep away from this house" if you were in or near the house at the time. But if you are telling us your practice, you are probably pointing to it from a mountain far away.

    If it's on a picture board in front of you, and there are three houses in the photo, you can point to the offending house and in that case your sentence would be correct.

    Thank you so much!!! You really helped me!! A million thanks!

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