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    #1

    She has learned roller-skating for two months.

    She has learned roller-skating for two months.

    Is the above sentence acceptable?

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    #2

    Exclamation Re: She has learned roller-skating for two months.

    Quote Originally Posted by sitifan View Post
    She has learned roller-skating for two months.

    Is the above sentence acceptable?
    It is in the present perfect tense and perfectly ok. Where is cause of doubt?

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    #3

    Re: She has learned roller-skating for two months.

    Wouldn't "She has been learning roller skating for two months" be clearer? The other construction might suggest that she mastered the art of roller skating two months ago.

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    #4

    Re: She has learned roller-skating for two months.

    1. The stray dog has run away from its master for a long time.
    2. It has been a long time since the stray dog ran away from its master.
    I think that #2 is correct. Is #1 also acceptable?
    _________________
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    #5

    Re: She has learned roller-skating for two months.

    The first one is oddly constructed but might suggest that the dog has a habit of running away, and has had this habit for a long time.

    The last one can have two entirely different meanings. It could be that the dog ran away a long time ago, and we've not seen it since. Or it could mean that the dog is much better behaved now than it was long ago; it hasn't run away recently.

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    #6

    Re: She has learned roller-skating for two months.

    He has moved to London for nearly three years.

    Is the above sentence acceptable?

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    #7

    Re: She has learned roller-skating for two months.

    Barely. I understand it. It might be better to say he's lived in London for nearly three years, or he moved to London nearly three years ago.

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