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    • Join Date: Oct 2008
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    #1

    Handling complicated sentences

    Is there a book to learn how to deal with complex sentences like the one below. I couldn't understand it at all. Pls help.

    Of Homer's two epic poems,the Odyssey has always been more popular than the Iliad, perhaps because it includes more features of mythology that are accesible by readers.Its subject (to use Maynard Mack's categories) is "life-as spectacle," for readers, diverted by its various incidents, observe its hero Odyssey primarily from without; the tragic Iliad, however, presents "life-as-experience" : readers are asked to identify with the mind of Achilles, whose motivations render him a not particularly likable hero . In addition.....

  1. whitemoon's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: Handling complicated sentences

    Here is a good book: High School English Grammar and Composition by Wern and Martin
    You can search this book and "complex sentence" in google search box.

  2. Raymott's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: Handling complicated sentences

    Quote Originally Posted by Bavananth View Post
    Is there a book to learn how to deal with complex sentences like the one below. I couldn't understand it at all. Pls help.

    Of Homer's two epic poems,the Odyssey has always been more popular than the Iliad, $perhaps because it includes more features of mythology that are accesible by readers. Its subject (to use Maynard Mack's categories) is "life-as spectacle," for readers, diverted by its various incidents, observe its hero Odyssey primarily from without; the tragic Iliad, however, presents "life-as-experience" : readers are asked to identify with the mind of Achilles, whose motivations render him a not particularly likable hero . In addition.....
    I think you mean complicated sentences, rather than complex sentences (which has a specific grammatical meaning).
    The best way to deal with them is to break them down into pieces.
    Its subject (to use Maynard Mack's categories) is "life-as spectacle," for readers, diverted by its various incidents, observe its hero Odyssey primarily from without; the tragic Iliad, however, presents "life-as-experience" : readers are asked to identify with the mind of Achilles, whose motivations render him a not particularly likable hero.

    Maynard Mack has two categories - "life-as-spectacle" and "life-as-experience".
    Find a place where you can break the sentence - I suggest: "The tragic Iliad, however ...." because it introduces an alternative topic.
    So, the first half is about the Odyssey and "life-as-spectacle ; the second half it about the Iliad and life-as-experience.


    The Odyssey's subject is 'life-as-spectacle' because readers are diverted by its tragic incidents. They observe the hero 'from without', that is, as a spectacle.
    The Iliad presents 'life-as-experience' because readers are asked to see into the mind of Achilles (that is, to experience). Readers see his motivations which make him not particularly likeable.
    You see into Achilles' mind, but not into Odysseus' - that is the difference between 'life-as-experience' and 'life-as-spectacle'.

    In a long complicated sentence, there is always a place where you can break it up and analyse each part.


    • Join Date: Oct 2008
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    #4

    Re: Handling complicated sentences

    Ah! Thanks moon! I have that book. It explains punctuations in a chapater in detail. But not to the level of to decode a sentence which match what I have given in the post.

    Thanks Raymott. I meant for complicated sentences. Sorry. That was a wonderful explanation.


    Anyway what is that 'from without' ? That looks funny.
    Last edited by Bavananth; 08-Oct-2008 at 12:28.


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    #5

    Re: Handling complicated sentences

    Its subject (to use Maynard Mack's categories) is "life-as spectacle," for readers, diverted by its various incidents, observe its hero Odyssey primarily from without; the tragic Iliad, however, presents "life-as-experience" : readers are asked to identify with the mind of Achilles, whose motivations render him a not particularly likable hero .

    Thank you so much for that reply raymott. I realised that,it is all about punctuation marks, from your reply.

    According to his explanantion and with help of a book I infered the use of punctuations. readers who are really interested about this, can use the detailed explanations below.

    (to use Maynard Mack's categories) paranthesis: to set off a strong or weak interruption.

    "life-as spectacle," quotation: to enclose a direct quotation

    , diverted by its various incidents, The bracketing comma: always comes as a pair and is used to mark off a weak interruption of a sentence

    from without; the tragic Iliad semicolon: to join two complete sentences into a single written sentence when the two sentences are too closely related to be separately by a full stop and there is no connecting word which would require a comma such as 'and' or 'but'

    "life-as-experience" : readers are asked to identify with the mind of Achilles colon : to indicate that what follows it is an explanation or elaboration of what precedes it

    identify with the mind of Achilles, whose motivations render him joining comma: used to join two complete sentences into a single sentence, when it must be used by one of the connecting words 'and', 'or', 'nor', 'but', 'while', 'so' and 'yet'

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