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    • Join Date: Apr 2008
    • Posts: 1,571
    #1

    word order

    Which of these phrases are grammatical?

    (1) a nice new pair of child's shoes
    (2) a pair of nice new child's shoes

    (3) a nice new pair of children's shoes
    (4) a pair of nice new children's shoes


    • Join Date: Nov 2007
    • Posts: 5,409
    #2

    Re: word order

    (3)

    The shoes are for 'children' the same as shoes for a man are 'men's shoes'
    So - we don't say (1)


    • Join Date: Apr 2008
    • Posts: 1,571
    #3

    Re: word order

    Thanks, David. Is it "a child's cap" or "a children's cap"?


    • Join Date: Nov 2007
    • Posts: 5,409
    #4

    Re: word order

    A child's cap was found in the playground. Anyone knowing...

    "Could you direct me to where I can buy a child's bike?"
    "Yes, madam. Children's bicycles(bikes) are on the third floor."


    • Join Date: Apr 2008
    • Posts: 1,571
    #5

    Re: word order

    If we change "pair" to plural, will the word order change?

    Three pairs of nice new children's shoes.

    (Or is it "three nice new pairs of children's shoes"?)


    • Join Date: Nov 2007
    • Posts: 5,409
    #6

    Re: word order

    We would say,
    Three pairs of nice new children's shoes
    or
    three nice pairs of new children's shoes
    or
    "three nice new pairs of children's shoes"

    Understand, the use of 'nice' suggests that a mother is (kind of ) saying this to, or in the presence of, the child who is receiving the shoes, so that this 'child's talk' affects the sentence.

    For an adult to use 'nice', we might say:
    She had three pairs of brand new shoes in her closet.
    And a woman might say:
    I'm popping into town to buy a couple of pairs of nice shoes.
    (When we talk about 'buying shoes', it is automatically assumed that they are 'new', that we are not going down to the local Charity Shop (where they sell secondhand clothes), so unless as in the 'closet' sentence, we are pointing out that they had hardly been worn = 'new', we wouldn't say 'new').

    If I mean I need more shoes to add to my wardrobe, I might say:
    I need some new shoes. I must remember when I'm in town on Saturday.
    Last edited by David L.; 10-Oct-2008 at 10:06.

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