Page 1 of 3 1 2 3 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 25
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Chinese
      • Home Country:
      • China
      • Current Location:
      • China

    • Join Date: Nov 2003
    • Posts: 2,712
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #1

    except and apart from

    Dear teachers,

    The store sells clothing and many other things___________ food.
    a. except for b. apart from
    The sentence means "The store doesn't sell food". The key is "b". However, I have consulted the dictionary and the definition of "apart from" is "except for". Could you please explain why "a" isn't correct?

    Looking forward to hearing from you.
    Thank you in advance.

    Jiang

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • Laos

    • Join Date: Nov 2002
    • Posts: 52,391
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #2

    Re: except and apart from

    How did you get the 'no food' meaning? What's the rest of the context?

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • Canada

    • Join Date: Oct 2008
    • Posts: 1,211
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #3

    Re: except and apart from

    Assuming you are sure the meaning is that the store does not sell food items at all, then I see nothing wrong with the store sells many things except food. I understand the apart from constructions, means the same thing, but I don't know why except would not be acceptable? Anyone?

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Vietnamese
      • Home Country:
      • Vietnam
      • Current Location:
      • Vietnam

    • Join Date: Oct 2008
    • Posts: 3,110
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #4

    Re: except and apart from

    a) is not correct due to missing "s": it must be "excepts for". Am I right?

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • Canada

    • Join Date: Oct 2008
    • Posts: 1,211
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #5

    Re: except and apart from

    No. There can be no s in except when used as a preposition (as it is used here) or as a conjunction.


    • Join Date: Feb 2008
    • Posts: 484
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #6

    Re: except and apart from

    Quote Originally Posted by jlinger View Post
    Assuming you are sure the meaning is that the store does not sell food items at all, then I see nothing wrong with the store sells many things except food. I understand the apart from constructions, means the same thing, but I don't know why except would not be acceptable? Anyone?
    I would accept both.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Chinese
      • Home Country:
      • China
      • Current Location:
      • China

    • Join Date: Nov 2003
    • Posts: 2,712
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #7

    Re: except and apart from

    Dear Todl,

    This is a multiple choice question so there is no context. I think "apart from" means "something that is no included". Is that right? That's why I ge the "no food" meaning.

    Looking forward to hearing from you.
    Thank you in advance.

    Jiang
    Quote Originally Posted by Tdol View Post
    How did you get the 'no food' meaning? What's the rest of the context?

  1. Raymott's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Australia
      • Current Location:
      • Australia

    • Join Date: Jun 2008
    • Posts: 23,270
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #8

    Re: except and apart from

    Quote Originally Posted by jiang View Post
    Dear Todl,

    This is a multiple choice question so there is no context. I think "apart from" means "something that is no included". Is that right? That's why I ge the "no food" meaning.

    Looking forward to hearing from you.
    Thank you in advance.

    Jiang
    Hi Jiang,
    You can't slot one of the multi-choice answers into the sentence to get the meaning and then choose the right answer based on that meaning.

    The store sells clothing and many other things___________ food.
    a. except for b. apart from

    a. "except for" means they don't sell food, and "things" should probably be followed by a comma.
    b. "apart from" means they do sell food.

    I'd choose b.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Chinese
      • Home Country:
      • China
      • Current Location:
      • China

    • Join Date: Nov 2003
    • Posts: 2,712
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #9

    Re: except and apart from

    Dear Raymott,

    Thank you very much for your explanation. I got confused because the definition of "apart from" is "except for". Your explanation helps a lot. However, I am afraid I have to further ask you a question to make sure I understand you.
    No.1
    "things" should probably be followed by a comma. If there is a comma it suggests food is not included.
    Quote Originally Posted by Raymott View Post
    Hi Jiang,
    You can't slot one of the multi-choice answers into the sentence to get the meaning and then choose the right answer based on that meaning.

    The store sells clothing and many other things___________ food.
    a. except for b. apart from

    a. "except for" means they don't sell food, and "things" should probably be followed by a comma.
    b. "apart from" means it doesn't sell food and because there is no comma we should think it also sells food. Is that right?

    Looking forward to hearing from you.
    Thank you in advance.

    Jiang

    I'd choose b.

  2. Raymott's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Australia
      • Current Location:
      • Australia

    • Join Date: Jun 2008
    • Posts: 23,270
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #10

    Re: except and apart from

    Quote Originally Posted by jiang View Post
    Dear Raymott,

    Thank you very much for your explanation. I got confused because the definition of "apart from" is "except for". Your explanation helps a lot. However, I am afraid I have to further ask you a question to make sure I understand you.
    No.1
    "things" should probably be followed by a comma. If there is a comma it suggests food is not included.
    "apart from" doesn't (always) mean "except for". It can mean the opposite.

    "Apart from food, they sell most household things." (As well as food ...") They sell food. I'd say that would be the most common understanding.
    "Apart from A" by itself does not tell whether A is included or not.

    "Except for food, they sell most household things." They don't sell food.
    No the comma doesn't change the grammar, but might make it more clear.

Page 1 of 3 1 2 3 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •