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      • Native Language:
      • Bulgarian
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      • Bulgaria
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      • Bulgaria

    • Join Date: Sep 2007
    • Posts: 5,000
    #1

    envious / jelous

    Dear teachers,

    There are two very ambiguous adjectives in English language: envious and jelous. Very often I run into heavy weather by their interpretation in my native language.

    He was envious of Lawson and he was jelous, not of the individual concerned, but of his love.
    To be envious of another’s good fortune(walth, rank, success, power)
    He was jelous of John or of John’s marks.
    But she could not prevent heself from speaking; she loved him too much, she was too agonizingly jelous.
    She was envious of my success; she was jelous of his love for science.
    Mr. Carey, thrifty by inclination and economical by necessity, accepted it with mingled feelings; he was envious of his brother because he could afford to give so much, pleased for the sake of his church, and vaguely irritate by a generousity which seemed almost ostentatious.
    I was sorry when the dance ended; at that time, as I watched others happy in love, I was sometimes envious-but not of Katherine. It was difficult to begrudge her any luck that came her way.
    She was envious, in a sad way, of Jenny’s good fortune.
    Everyone with any brains knows what a pack of jelous jackals they are!
    an envious look
    a jelous look
    an envious amasement
    a jelous amazement
    He was in the same form as Philip and Philip had alwayslooked upon him with envious admiration.
    All the coherence of her life belonged to Condaford; she had a passion for the place which no one would have suspected from her way of talking of it, and she had a deep and jelous desire to bind her only brother to the same devotion.
    “Good sailor!” He replied in answer to a mild young man’s envious query. “Well. I did feel a little queer once, I confess..”
    It amused her that I could work in the office all day, talk to her at the café over pot after pot of tea until she caught her train, and then go off and apply my mind for hours to the law of torts. But it was an envious ammusment. She had played with music and painting, but she had nothing to do. She felt tht she too should have been driven to work.

    Would you be kind enough to tell me how you get out of the same kind of a difficulty?

    Thank you for your efforts.

    Regards,

    V.


    • Join Date: Oct 2006
    • Posts: 19,434
    #2

    Re: envious / jelous

    They are very different. Being envious is nothing like as strong as being jealous, and has less emotional content:

    Envy = to wish that you had something that another person has

    Jealous = feeling bitter and unhappy because of another's advantages, possessions, or luck; feeling suspicious about a rival's or competitor's influence, especially in regard to a loved one.

    In this context: All the coherence of her life belonged to Condaford; she had a passion for the place which no one would have suspected from her way of talking of it, and she had a deep and jealous desire to bind her only brother to the same devotion. the word means possessively watchful of something

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