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    #1

    present perfect or present perfect continuous

    Dear teachers,

    Would you be kind enough to explain me the following conformity with a law in the English grammar?

    1.1. He has been driving for 4 hours.
    1.2. He has driven 320 miles.

    2.1. Jack has been painting for 4 hours.
    2.2. Jack has painted 4 aquarells.

    Thank you for your efforts.

    Regards,

    V.


    • Join Date: Feb 2008
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    #2

    Re: present perfect or present perfect continuous

    Hi.
    I am just a student but we have had this topic recently.

    One could say that there are many sentences in which you can use either the present perfect or the present perfect progressive.
    Still there is a small differentation.
    The present perfect is used to express the end of an action and its outcome whereas the present perfect progressive is used to express the duration of an action or its interception.

    I have written five letters. -> outcome= five letters

    I have been waiting for two hous. -> duration

    I have done my homework-> I am now finished

    I have been doing my homework -> It is not clear whether I am finished or still have to do sth.

    On a German website I found out that there are some subdivisions when to use the pp or the ppp.

    Outcome pp / Unpreferred byeffect ppp

    Outcome pp: I have washed the car (it is clean now)

    Byeffect: Why are you so wet? I have been washing the car.

    Permanent pp /Momentarily ppp

    Permanent:James has lived in London for ten years (He will live here for a while)

    Momentarily: James has been living here for a year (It is clear that he won't stay here forever. Maybe he is just here for a school exchange?)


    I hope I could help you


    Best wishes Maluues

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    #3

    Re: present perfect or present perfect continuous

    Could someone explain the difference:

    1. We’ve been living here in Brighton since 1988 – the year we got married.

    2. We've lived in this house for over twenty years - ever since July 1981 to be precise.

    (taken from BBC Learning English)

    Are "present perfect" and "present perfect continuous" interchangeable here?

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    #4

    Smile Re: present perfect or present perfect continuous

    Quote Originally Posted by dimkin7 View Post
    Could someone explain the difference:

    1. We’ve been living here in Brighton since 1988 – the year we got married.

    2. We've lived in this house for over twenty years - ever since July 1981 to be precise.

    (taken from BBC Learning English)

    Are "present perfect" and "present perfect continuous" interchangeable here?
    Generally speaking, yes.


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