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  1. Offroad's Avatar
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    #1

    Smile are they synonyms

    Please, dear teachers and friends?

    Are these verbs synonyms with each other?

    respond
    answer
    reply
    <?>

    Thank you!

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    #2

    Re: are they synonyms

    Hi-

    Yes, the meanings are synonomous, but the verbs have different patterns:

    -you say respond and reply (to something): He responded to the question quickly;

    -you say answer (something): He answered the questions quickly.

    You can use all three on their own, too.

    I hope this helps.

    Mary

  2. Offroad's Avatar
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    #3

    Smile Re: are they synonyms

    Quote Originally Posted by MaryTeacher View Post
    Hi-

    Yes, the meanings are synonomous, but the verbs have different patterns:

    -you say respond and reply (to something): He responded to the question quickly;

    -you say answer (something): He answered the questions quickly.

    You can use all three on their own, too.

    I hope this helps.

    Mary
    Let me see if I got this straight...

    They are synonyms with each other, besides the prepostion that might be required, they have the same meaning, right?

    He's replied the question;
    I thougth 'reply' could be used in some kind of mailing, forums, letters contexts.

    He's responded to the question;
    'respond' sounds, to me, like the act of serve someone.
    He respond to everything his master asks.
    He responded to the calling.

    He's anwered the question;
    Sounds like the student answering a teacher's question.
    Alicia answered her teacher quickly.
    He answered the phone/door!

    Are they fine?

    Many thanks

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    #4

    Re: are they synonyms

    All your examples are synonyms and none carries any connotations of either written response or servitude.

    (You do need the to after reply, however)

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    #5

    Re: are they synonyms

    Hi-

    Yes, we do use usually use 'reply' or 'respond' in the context of email or written correspondence: I replied to his email yesterday. I responded to the letter.

    'Respond' doesn't have a connotation of servitude.

    Take care,
    Mary

  3. BobK's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: are they synonyms

    Quote Originally Posted by MaryTeacher View Post
    ...
    'Respond' doesn't have a connotation of servitude.

    Take care,
    Mary
    But 'answer to <someone>' does 'How dare you order me around. I don't answer to you'.

    And you can respond without replying. A coma patient is monitored for various things; one of them is 'does s/he respond to pain'; the response in this case is probably not 'I have received your pinch of 12 October. Ouch - why did you do that?' - it may just be a slight tensing of the facial muscles. But Raymott would know more than I do about this sort of response. To take an example nearer home, I respond to some e-mails - from Nigerian businessman, for example, offering riches beyond measure in return for a small administration charge of 1000 -by deleting them.

    There are some senses in which those three words - allowing for the differing requirement for a preposition - may be interchangeable. There are other sense in which they are not. A good dictionary will help you compare/contrast the meanings. And as I sometimes tell students 'I am not a dictionary'.

    b

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