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    #1

    Allude, alluded, alludes?

    Is the use of the word 'alludes' incorrect in the following sentence?

    A 'certain gospel' acknowledges her awareness of another way of life that she has observed, but one that alludes her in that 'she has not learned'.

    Thank you.
    Last edited by Willsey; 12-Oct-2008 at 17:06. Reason: used the word 'world' instead of 'word'

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    #2

    Re: Allude, alluded, alludes?

    Quote Originally Posted by Willsey View Post
    Is the use of the word 'alludes' incorrect in the following sentence?

    A 'certain gospel' acknowledges her awareness of another way of life that she has observed, but one that alludes her in that 'she has not learned'.

    Thank you.
    I think it should be "eludes". A dictionary should sort it out for you.


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    #3

    Re: Allude, alluded, alludes?

    However, neither 'alludes' nor 'eludes' is appropriate in your sentence.
    The word you need is 'escapes'.
    Last edited by David L.; 13-Oct-2008 at 11:05.

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    #4

    Re: Allude, alluded, alludes?

    Quote Originally Posted by David L. View Post
    However, neither 'alludes' nor 'eludes' are appropriate in your sentence.
    The word you need is 'escapes'.
    I'm not sure I understand your point, David.
    Can you explain why 'escapes' is more appropriate than 'eludes' here?

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    #5

    Re: Allude, alluded, alludes?

    Hi

    elude (v) = see synonyms at escape.

    1. To evade or escape from, as by daring, cleverness, or skill: The suspect continues to elude the police.
    2. To escape the understanding or grasp of: a name that has always eluded me; a metaphor that eluded them.


    elude: Definition, Synonyms from Answers.com

    Escape can mean to get free or to remain untouched or unaffected by something unwanted.
    To elude is to get away from artfully.


    Regards,


    V
    Last edited by vil; 13-Oct-2008 at 11:02.


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    #6

    Re: Allude, alluded, alludes?

    vil:


    You put some native speakers to shame!

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    #7

    Re: Allude, alluded, alludes?

    Quote Originally Posted by vil View Post
    Hi

    elude (v) = see synonyms at escape.

    1. To evade or escape from, as by daring, cleverness, or skill: The suspect continues to elude the police.
    2. To escape the understanding or grasp of: a name that has always eluded me; a metaphor that eluded them.


    elude: Definition, Synonyms from Answers.com

    Escape can mean to get free or to remain untouched or unaffected by something unwanted.
    To elude is to get away from artfully.


    Regards,


    V

    Yes, that's one definition, Vil, but the "artful" is not necessary

    Here's Miriam-Webster

    elude

    Function:transitive verb
    Inflected Form(s):
    elud·ed; elud·ing
    Etymology:Latin eludere, from e- + ludere to play — more at ludicrous
    2
    : to escape the perception, understanding, or grasp of <subtlety simply eludes them> <victory continued to elude us>

    There is no suggestion here that subtlety or victory is being artful.

    Subtlety and victory elude them/us like "another way of life" eludes the woman.
    The other way of life is not "escaping" her as if it's actively trying to get away from her; it is "eluding" her as in "escaping her perception or grasp".

    Here is Cambridge
    elude (NOT ACHIEVE)
    verb [T] FORMAL
    If something that you want eludes you, you do not succeed in achieving it:
    The gold medal continues to elude her
    They had minor breakthroughs but real success eluded them.


    Again in this definition, there is no sense of the gold medal or success "artfully" eluding. As above, it means "failing to achieve".
    The woman failed to achieve the other way of life.

    Even in the second definition of your dictionary, there is no mention of artfulness or consciousness of the eluding factor.

    The other way of life "escapes the understanding or grasp of" the women.
    It doesn't merely escape her.

    "Elude" was made for this sentence. That's why I was hoping David would justify his choice.
    Last edited by Raymott; 13-Oct-2008 at 13:16.

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    #8

    Re: Allude, alluded, alludes?

    I don't mind your contradicting me when I am wrong, David. But I was hoping that at least when you make a blunder, you'd try to explain yourself.
    Since you've taken it upon yourself to be my corrector, you might edify us with an explanation of why you think "neither 'alludes' nor 'eludes' is appropriate in your sentence".

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    #9

    Re: Allude, alluded, alludes?

    Hello gentlemen.
    Could you be so kind and help me with understanding the sentence?

    A 'certain gospel' acknowledges her awareness of another way of life that she has observed, but one that alludes her in that 'she has not learned'.

    Do 'she and her' reffer to the same person ?

    A ‘certain gospel’ acknowledges ( tell us something, recognise something )
    her awareness of another way of life (that is the something recognised by the ‘certain gospel’)
    that she has observed , ( that is an important fragment I’d like to come back later )
    but one that ( does ‘one that’ refer to ‘she has not learned’ ?)
    escape/elude her ( never mind )
    in that ( does ‘that’ refer to the observation ? )
    ‘she has not learned’ ( Does it mean that she hasn't noticed the another way of live ?)

    Does "story acknowledges sb's awarness of sth" mean that the story confirmes sb awarness or the story acknowledges sb's state of awarness ??
    What is the difference between being aware and learn ?

    If my interpretation is correct then the question is whether the observation was intentional or not.
    If the observation was intentional with the intention to notice ‘another way of life '
    If she deliberately was looking for it then I’d say that she failed in archiving it ( one that eluded her) .
    If the observation wasn’t intentional then that just escaped her (one that escaped her )

    Btw
    In my humble opinion too many personal remarks.
    it's just a learner opinion.
    Cheers,
    Last edited by Jaskin; 23-Oct-2008 at 14:42. Reason: spelling correction, another question

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