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    • Join Date: Feb 2008
    • Posts: 269
    #1

    should

    Hi,

    I have a question about the word "should" in this context. If I say this sentence without "should", like, "If you come in physical contact with a bat, it's important to get in touch with the health department or a doctor immediately." Then is there a difference between them? I mean, is there a special meaning for "should" in this context ?

    Thanks for your help.


    The public health officer is discussing bats.

    Officer: Bats are the most likely carriers of rabies in our area, and almost one hundred percent of rabies cases are fatal. Make sure your dogs and cats are vaccinated against rabies. If you should come in physical contact with a bat, it's important to get in touch with the health department or a doctor immediately. If possible, catch the bat so it can be tested for rabies.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • Canada

    • Join Date: Oct 2008
    • Posts: 1,211
    #2

    Re: should

    Personally, I consider it an affectation. There is no need for the word. It seems to be either a softening word (makes the likelihood of the event less likely), a filler, or a dresser (fancifier).

    Furthermore, it also bears no relation to the actual definitions of the word "should" - which either relate to the shall/will debate, or relate to a plan to do something or an obligation to do something. I should delete it if I were you, if you should ever come across it again.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Portuguese
      • Home Country:
      • Tuvalu
      • Current Location:
      • Tuvalu

    • Join Date: Oct 2007
    • Posts: 1,860
    #3

    Re: should

    Hi,
    Isn't that a typo? Isn't that "would" instead?
    Just a student.

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