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  1. thedaffodils's Avatar
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    #1

    snow hit

    Hello!

    I am fumbling around for an English word which means hit. Its first letter is "p", and probably like "pommet" or "pammer"... It usually is collocated with snow. Could someone possibly tell me what it is?

    Many thanks!

  2. BobK's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: snow hit

    Quote Originally Posted by thedaffodils View Post
    Hello!

    I am fumbling around for an English word which means hit. Its first letter is "p", and probably like "pommet" or "pammer"... It usually is collocated with snow. Could someone possibly tell me what it is?

    Many thanks!
    Excuse me for resurrecting the post you'd deleted, but the note you wrote when you deleted it gave a wrong guess as the reason. It's not 'pommel' - which is a fairly obscure noun relating to a piece of gymnastic equipment.

    You may be thinking of 'pummel' (which means to hit repeatedly) though I don't know what this has to do with snow.

    (Incidentally, 'pummel' is a word I must add to a collection of words I'm compiling that all have a short vowel and a double consonant. Many words like this refer to repeated and/or trivial and/or superficial actions.)

    b

  3. thedaffodils's Avatar
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    #3

    Post Re: snow hit

    Hello BobK,

    You're always helpful. Thank you!

    You may be thinking of 'pummel' (which means to hit repeatedly) though I don't know what this has to do with snow
    Yes, I mean "pummel". I have been trying to recall this word, which I learned from some English reports about snow disaster.

    eg. The snow pummelled Canada... (I cannot remember the sentence exactly)

  4. BobK's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: snow hit

    Quote Originally Posted by thedaffodils View Post
    Hello BobK,

    You're always helpful. Thank you!



    Yes, I mean "pummel". I have been trying to recall this word, which I learned from some English reports about snow disaster.

    eg. The snow pummelled Canada... (I cannot remember the sentence exactly)
    That sounds possible. As I said 'pummel' is applied to a repeated or continuous hitting actions*, so - although it's an unusual image in Br English (as in the UK the snow is usually less constant and less violent) - it would be fine in a context like "They trudged on, in spite of the constant pummelling of the snow".

    b
    *In fact I didn't say this directly, but I implied it - as other double-consonant words (like "ripple" or "dribble") also (often, but certainly not always) refer to repeated or continuous or superficial actions. "Pummelling his chest" is what the heroine does to the hero the first time they meet and he's in disguise and she tries to fight him; he smiles of course, and she is angry that her blows make no impression.

  5. thedaffodils's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: snow hit

    Hi BobK,

    Thank you for your reply.

    Early this year, I read "pummel" in a report again from The Economist about China's heavy snow disaster in the southwest of China. I wrote the word which was new in my notebook but I could not find it out yesterday.

    And it is interesting to learn that double consonant word
    often refer to repeated or continuous or superficial actions. Thank you for telling me about this.

  6. BobK's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: snow hit

    Quote Originally Posted by thedaffodils View Post
    Hi BobK,

    Thank you for your reply.

    Early this year, I read "pummel" in a report again from The Economist about China's heavy snow disaster in the southwest of China. I wrote the word which was new in my notebook but I could not find it out yesterday.

    And it is interesting to learn that double consonant word
    often refer to repeated or continuous or superficial actions. Thank you for telling me about this.
    I should emphasize that what I have told you is just an idea that came to me when a student asked me about one of these words ("patter", I think). I didn't get it from a book, and it's not a Truth I'm trying to teach; it's just an observation. There are lots of words that don't fit thi pattern.



    b
    Last edited by BobK; 17-Oct-2008 at 11:15. Reason: Add final example

  7. thedaffodils's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: snow hit

    Quote Originally Posted by BobK View Post
    I should emphasize that what I have told you is just an idea that came to me when a student asked me about one of these words ("patter", I think). I didn't get it from a book, and it's not a Truth I'm trying to teach; it's just an observation. There are lots of words that don't fit thi pattern.



    b

    Hello BobK,

    Thank you for your clarification. It is good to dabble in it.

    Have a good day there.

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