Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 19
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Chinese
      • Home Country:
      • China
      • Current Location:
      • China

    • Join Date: May 2008
    • Posts: 468
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #1

    negate the answer?

    Yesterday I asked my students a question in class. The first student to answer the question gave a wrong answer. When the second student repeated the same wrong answer, I said, "Sorry, you didn't listen to that student attentively. I have already negated this answer." But after class when I ponder over this collocation, I felt that I might have made a mistake---"negate" may not be used this way. Afterwards I looked it up in my dictionaries. One dictionary tells me that "negate" means "nullify" or "to state that something does not exist" and another dictionary says its synonym is "deny". It seems that I did make a mistake. I know when I am not sure of something, I should avoid using that construction in class. In this case I could instead say "Sorry, you didn't listen carefully. I have already said no to this answer." or something which I am sure grammatically correct. Although I have a teacher of English for some years, I admit I am still ignorant of many things about the English language. However, I always like and sometimes have to take risks when talking and writing in English. Afterwards I will consult others or my dictionaries about it. Sometimes I am proven wrong, but I never regret taking such risks. Back to "negate", I would like especially native speakers of English to tell me whether I can use "negate an answer" in this classroom situation or not.
    Thanks.


    • Join Date: Feb 2008
    • Posts: 484
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #2

    Re: negate the answer?

    Quote Originally Posted by ohmyrichard View Post
    Yesterday I asked my students a question in class. The first student to answer the question gave a wrong answer. When the second student repeated the same wrong answer, I said, "Sorry, you didn't listen to that student attentively. I have already negated this answer." But after class when I ponder over this collocation, I felt that I might have made a mistake---"negate" may not be used this way. Afterwards I looked it up in my dictionaries. One dictionary tells me that "negate" means "nullify" or "to state that something does not exist" and another dictionary says its synonym is "deny". It seems that I did make a mistake. I know when I am not sure of something, I should avoid using that construction in class. In this case I could instead say "Sorry, you didn't listen carefully. I have already said no to this answer." or something which I am sure grammatically correct. Although I have a teacher of English for some years, I admit I am still ignorant of many things about the English language. However, I always like and sometimes have to take risks when talking and writing in English. Afterwards I will consult others or my dictionaries about it. Sometimes I am proven wrong, but I never regret taking such risks. Back to "negate", I would like especially native speakers of English to tell me whether I can use "negate an answer" in this classroom situation or not.
    Thanks.
    Actually no, you couldn't put it like that. You could have said, "Actually I have already said that that answer is incorrect".

    But we all make mistakes in the classroom, even native speakers; so you mustn't let it upset you.

  1. BobK's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • UK

    • Join Date: Jul 2006
    • Posts: 16,035
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #3

    Re: negate the answer?

    If you wanted to make a joke of it, you could have said it 'went in one ear and out the other'.

    b

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Chinese
      • Home Country:
      • China
      • Current Location:
      • China

    • Join Date: May 2008
    • Posts: 468
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #4

    Re: negate the answer?

    Quote Originally Posted by naomimalan View Post
    Actually no, you couldn't put it like that. You could have said, "Actually I have already said that that answer is incorrect".

    But we all make mistakes in the classroom, even native speakers; so you mustn't let it upset you.
    Thanks for your kind words. Sometimes I do feel upset when afterwards I come to know that I have made a mistake in class and students may have taken notes of it. By the way, would you please tell me about your understanding of the verb "negate" and give me some example sentences? As you can see it, I haven't really learned this word(Another risk I wanted to take: Can I say instead: I haven't really aquired this word?).
    Thanks again.

  2. BobK's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • UK

    • Join Date: Jul 2006
    • Posts: 16,035
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #5

    Re: negate the answer?

    Quote Originally Posted by ohmyrichard View Post
    Thanks for your kind words. Sometimes I do feel upset when afterwards I come to know that I have made a mistake in class and students may have taken notes of it. Don't worry - that's a feeling we all get - even native speakers. I greatly admire second-language speakers of English who teach ELT (and I certainly don't feel 'we're the only ones who can do it properly' - there are some learning problems that a non-native teacher will understand better).
    By the way, would you please tell me about your understanding of the verb "negate" and give me some example sentences? As you can see it, I haven't really learned this word(Another risk I wanted to take: Can I say instead: I haven't really a^c^quired this word?).
    Thanks again.
    It seems to me that 'negate' can mean more than just 'say the opposite':
    'I can't understand the Senate vote in favour of the bailout. It negates everything Americans stand for.' That is, it doesn't just say the opposite, it does something (or, in this case, shows a willingness to do something).

    b

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Chinese
      • Home Country:
      • China
      • Current Location:
      • China

    • Join Date: May 2008
    • Posts: 468
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #6

    Re: negate the answer?

    Quote Originally Posted by BobK View Post
    It seems to me that 'negate' can mean more than just 'say the opposite':
    'I can't understand the Senate vote in favour of the bailout. It negates everything Americans stand for.' That is, it doesn't just say the opposite, it does something (or, in this case, shows a willingness to do something).

    b
    Thanks, Bobk. But would you please paraphrase "It negates everything Americans stands for"? I used to neglect what I found too hard to understand and seldom did I try hard to make out the real meaning of what I seemingly understood but actually did not. But now I think it is a bad habit.
    Last edited by ohmyrichard; 19-Oct-2008 at 16:12.

  3. BobK's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • UK

    • Join Date: Jul 2006
    • Posts: 16,035
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #7

    Re: negate the answer?

    It goes against the American spirit [pioneering, self-reliant]
    or, more loosely,
    It makes a mockery of everything that Americans hold dear

    b


    • Join Date: Feb 2008
    • Posts: 484
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #8

    Re: negate the answer?

    Quote Originally Posted by ohmyrichard View Post
    Thanks for your kind words. Sometimes I do feel upset when afterwards I come to know that I have made a mistake in class and students may have taken notes of it. By the way, would you please tell me about your understanding of the verb "negate" and give me some example sentences? As you can see it, I haven't really learned this word(Another risk I wanted to take: Can I say instead: I haven't really aquired this word?).
    Thanks again.
    "Sometimes I do feel upset when afterwards I come to know that I have made a mistake in class and students may have taken notes of it."
    I don't think students often take notes about what you are saying unless it has to do with grammar or vocabulary. But if someone ever challenged you by reminding you that you said X or Y, you could always say something like, "Oh goodness! Did I really say that? I must have been out of my mind!"

    By the way, would you please tell me about your understanding of the verb "negate" and give me some example sentences?
    You could take a look here: http://www.answers.com/topic/negate

    As you can see it, I haven't really learned this word(Another risk I wanted to take: Can I say instead: I haven't really aquired this word?).
    Maybe you could say "I can't quite grasp this word."

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Portuguese
      • Home Country:
      • Tuvalu
      • Current Location:
      • Tuvalu

    • Join Date: Oct 2007
    • Posts: 1,860
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #9

    Re: negate the answer?

    Hi,

    I am just a student.

    I used to take chances before, employing words that ''seemed'' to me to be appropriate just to experiment and wait for the listener reaction. Afterwards, when I found out that I said something very stupid I felt like a cocky guy trying to show that I know English more than I actually do.

    I am not saying that it's anybody's case! Please don't take me wrong!

    However, I definitely changed my way of thinking about that. Today I avoid saying something when I am not 100% sure about that. And, whenever it's possible, I take the opportunity to clarify my doubt with the person who I am talking to.

    Just a student.
    Last edited by jctgf; 18-Oct-2008 at 16:29.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Chinese
      • Home Country:
      • China
      • Current Location:
      • China

    • Join Date: May 2008
    • Posts: 468
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #10

    Re: negate the answer?

    Quote Originally Posted by jctgf View Post
    Hi,

    I am just a student.

    I used to take chances before, employing words that ''seemed'' to me to be appropriate just to experiment and wait for the listener reaction. Afterwards, when I found out that I said something very stupid I felt like a cocky guy trying to show that I know English more than I actually know.

    I am not saying that it's anybody's case! Please don't take me wrong!

    However, I definitely changed my way of thinking about that. Today I avoid saying something when I am not 100% sure about that. And, whenever it's possible, I take the opportunity to clarify my doubt with the person who I am talking to.

    Just a student.
    Yeah, you are right. I also tell myself and my students to use what we are 100% sure of, especially when we are taking a test which is important to our future. But you know, sometimes it is an emergency; for example, when you are delivering an impromptu speech, you may fail to find a proper word although you have searched your mind. And in this situation, oftentimes we will take a risk and also chances of making mistakes are large. So, now I have modified my assertion a little bit: We are allowed to make mistakes unless we are lazy or make mistakes due to our carelessness. When afterwards we feel that there is something wrong with our diction or other aspects of language, we should go to our dictionaries or consult others to make things out. This way of doing things would be learning from our mistakes. From my own learning experience, these mistakes lead us to more English words and usages. But when we are doing something which may decide our future, like taking a very important test or having a job interview, we should make sure that everything in our writing or speech is correct, better perfect.
    I would like to invite you to make a comment on my new assertion.

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. The question difficult to answer
    By joham in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 29-Dec-2007, 15:22
  2. Confused between Don't and doesn't
    By MariaElena Shetler in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 15-Mar-2007, 23:36
  3. Kindly answer the questions.
    By asad hussain in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 24
    Last Post: 29-Jan-2007, 00:49
  4. Question about answer, reply,take care ...
    By JJD in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: 25-Aug-2006, 04:24
  5. Replies: 1
    Last Post: 13-May-2005, 07:00

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •