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  1. Unregistered
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    #1

    on tick

    hello teachers,

    I do comprehend the meaning of it but I wonder what other words that are used nowadays since this phrase has been considered 'old fashioned'.
    Will people give me a strange look when I say 'Can I buy the shoes on tick?'
    Is it correct to say 'I'm sorry, I don't have enough cash, can I have it on tick'?

    I just want to know how common is the phrase and if the sentences I made are correct.
    Thanks for your help.

  2. buggles's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • England

    • Join Date: Aug 2007
    • Posts: 3,987
    #2

    Re: on tick

    Quote Originally Posted by Unregistered View Post
    hello teachers,

    I do comprehend the meaning of it but I wonder what other words that are used nowadays since this phrase has been considered 'old fashioned'.
    Will people give me a strange look when I say 'Can I buy the shoes on tick?'
    Is it correct to say 'I'm sorry, I don't have enough cash, can I have it on tick'?

    I just want to know how common is the phrase and if the sentences I made are correct.
    Thanks for your help.
    The nearest thing I can think of is "deferred payment plan".

    You're right that "on tick" is old fashioned, but all native speakers (except youngsters) would understand this phrase. Despite this, few people in Britain would buy small items, like shoes, on tick. Deferred payment plans tend to be used for things like furniture e.g. "buy now-pay in 6 months".

    buggles(not a teacher)

  3. RonBee's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Feb 2003
    • Posts: 16,551
    #3

    Re: on tick

    A: Can I put it on tick?
    B: I don't know what that means. Do you want to pay cash, or do you want to put it on your debit card?
    I asked my consultant (my wife) about this one, and the only time she heard the phrase she didn't know what it meant. Perhaps it is an AmE/BrE difference.



    • Join Date: Oct 2006
    • Posts: 19,434
    #4

    Re: on tick

    It is believed to be an abbreviation for "on the ticket", and means to get something on credit. I suspect it derives from pawnbroking, where a ticket was issued for deposited items. Another term used is "on the slate", where shops or pubs kept a slate on which people's purchased but unpaid items were recorded.

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