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    #1

    Cool haven't??

    Hi,

    I thought we could use 'have' only in the present perfect. Look at the following sentence:

    "I haven't the faintest idea as to whether stocks will be higher or lower a month or a year from now.' (WARREN BUFFETT)

    Shouldn't it be: 'I don't have the faintest idea...'

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    #2

    Re: haven't??

    Both equally correct, and equal in meaning, and intensity, as far as I know.


    • Join Date: Oct 2008
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    #3

    Re: haven't??

    In my opinion, it is used in someone' property too.
    eg, I have my family and pets.

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    #4

    Re: haven't??

    Quote Originally Posted by bieasy View Post
    Hi,

    I thought we could use 'have' only in the present perfect. Look at the following sentence:

    "I haven't the faintest idea as to whether stocks will be higher or lower a month or a year from now.' (WARREN BUFFETT)

    Shouldn't it be: 'I don't have the faintest idea...'

    Breaking News, Analysis, Opinions, Multimedia and Blogs - TIME
    Do you mean that rule to apply only in the negative?
    That's a beginner's rule. We see quite a few of those here. They're generally correct but they omit the word "usually" or "generally" such as "One generally only uses the negative of "have" in the present perfect".
    So, we don't say "I haven't a car", but we do say "I haven't the faintest idea ...".

    The "generally" is probably left out because either i) the teacher does not want to be overwhelmed with premature questions about where the exceptions exist, or ii) the writer of the rule does not know that exceptions exist.

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