Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 11

    • Join Date: Aug 2008
    • Posts: 26
    #1

    Accompanying cassette?

    Dear teacher,

    I have seen below sentence in Oxford dictionary:
    "Each pack contains a book and accompanying cassette."

    Question:
    1. Why 'accompany" is in ~ing form here?
    2. Is it a ~ing clause? If it is; shouldn't it without "and"? as when I looked through grammar books there aren't any "and" in ~ing clauses.
    Example: Kate is in the kitchen making coffee.
    (= She is in the kitchen and she is making coffee.)
    3. Or could "accompanying" an adjective? If so, shouldn't it be:
    "Each pack contains a book and an accompanying cassette. (God knows what its mean :p)
    4. Is there any different if I change the sentence to :
    "Each pack contains a book and a cassette."?

    I am looking for any grammatical explanation.
    Thank you.

    ong

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • Canada

    • Join Date: Oct 2008
    • Posts: 1,211
    #2

    Re: Accompanying cassette?

    "accompanying" is an adjective, not a verb or gerund.

    Yes, it might be stated "and an accompanying cassette" but that is not absolutely necessary. As I personally believe in parrallelism, when you say "a book" I agree you should say "and an other item."


    • Join Date: Aug 2008
    • Posts: 26
    #3

    Re: Accompanying cassette?

    Thanks a lot jlinger. If it is an adjective then that is another problem occur.

    What exactly does "accompanying cassette" mean? Does it means a cassette which comes together with a book?

    If so, can I say "I am here with my accompanying wife."?(I ome here together with my wife.)

    Hope to hear from you again.

    Thanks
    ong

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • Canada

    • Join Date: Oct 2008
    • Posts: 1,211
    #4

    Re: Accompanying cassette?

    No, it doesn't work that way. The "with" already said she was accompanying you.
    I am here WITH my wife.

    It would be possible, but awkward, to say something in that line, but it is so much easier to say, "I am here with my wife." You might say, "They, and their accompanying children, are going to the beach" but no one would say it that way. They would just say, "They are going to the beach with their kids."


    • Join Date: Aug 2008
    • Posts: 26
    #5

    Re: Accompanying cassette?

    Thanks for the reply again, jlinger. So, "accompanying" is not really a good adjective to be used anyway right? Then could I possibly say that the sentence which I found from the dictionary is not a good sentence?
    (Each pack contains a book and accompanying cassette.)

    Thanks.
    ong

  1. Raymott's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Australia
      • Current Location:
      • Australia

    • Join Date: Jun 2008
    • Posts: 24,092
    #6

    Re: Accompanying cassette?

    Quote Originally Posted by ongshang View Post
    Thanks for the reply again, jlinger. So, "accompanying" is not really a good adjective to be used anyway right? Then could I possibly say that the sentence which I found from the dictionary is not a good sentence?
    (Each pack contains a book and accompanying cassette.)

    Thanks.
    ong
    No, I don't think he's said that.
    There is nothing wrong with that sentence.


    • Join Date: Aug 2008
    • Posts: 26
    #7

    Re: Accompanying cassette?

    Raymott, thanks for the reply as well. I know that jlinger didn't mean that. That was just my thought after reading his reply:

    (It would be possible, but awkward, to say something in that line, but it is so much easier to say, "I am here with my wife." You might say, "They, and their accompanying children, are going to the beach" but no one would say it that way. They would just say, "They are going to the beach with their kids.")

    As he said that it is so much easier to say "sb/sth with sb/sth". The sentence "each pack contains a book and accompanying cassette." isn't easier to say in this way: each pack contains a book and a cassette."?

    If "accompanying" is okay. Could you please show me some examples how can I use it correctly and doesn't sound awkward?

    Thanks a lot.
    ong

  2. Raymott's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Australia
      • Current Location:
      • Australia

    • Join Date: Jun 2008
    • Posts: 24,092
    #8

    Re: Accompanying cassette?

    Quote Originally Posted by ongshang View Post
    Raymott, thanks for the reply as well. I know that jlinger didn't mean that. That was just my thought after reading his reply:

    (It would be possible, but awkward, to say something in that line, but it is so much easier to say, "I am here with my wife." You might say, "They, and their accompanying children, are going to the beach" but no one would say it that way. They would just say, "They are going to the beach with their kids.")

    As he said that it is so much easier to say "sb/sth with sb/sth". The sentence "each pack contains a book and accompanying cassette." isn't easier to say in this way: each pack contains a book and a cassette."?
    If "accompanying" is okay. Could you please show me some examples how can I use it correctly and doesn't sound awkward?

    Thanks a lot.
    ong
    I think you are attaching too much importance to one person's opinion.
    Here is one sentence in which it doesn't sound awkward:
    "Each pack contains a book and accompanying cassette."

    We don't normally stress ourselves too much over whether a sentence with or without "a" is easier to say or not. If they are both right, there are plenty of other things in life to worry about. We simply write the sentence with or without "a" and damn the consequences!

    Here are some further correct sentences with "accompanying":
    "I am writing a musical piece for voice and accompanying piano."
    "His wife will be accompanying him to the opera."
    "Please see the accompanying article". (This is similar to "attached").

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • Canada

    • Join Date: Oct 2008
    • Posts: 1,211
    #9

    Re: Accompanying cassette?

    Okay, let's wade in again.

    Accompanying stresses that it goes with it, that it enhances the subject, that it adds to the experience, that it matches the original product, or in some way is significantly tied to the item. It is hardly necessary to use that word with your wife.

    To say the package includes a book and a cassette is fine, but to add accompanying suggests the cassette is to enhance the book's message or content. Otherwise, it might be entirely unrelated.

  3. Raymott's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Australia
      • Current Location:
      • Australia

    • Join Date: Jun 2008
    • Posts: 24,092
    #10

    Re: Accompanying cassette?

    Quote Originally Posted by jlinger View Post
    Okay, let's wade in again.

    Accompanying stresses that it goes with it, that it enhances the subject, that it adds to the experience, that it matches the original product, or in some way is significantly tied to the item. It is hardly necessary to use that word with your wife.

    To say the package includes a book and a cassette is fine, but to add accompanying suggests the cassette is to enhance the book's message or content. Otherwise, it might be entirely unrelated.
    Yes, that's what it means; for example a 2nd language book and accompanying cassette (which gives pronunciation of the sentences in the book).
    Language generally isn't and/all. Context plays a large part. Neither of us is wrong - we are just looking at it from different perspectives.

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •